Help installing 220 receptacle for range

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  #1  
Old 02-27-07, 05:06 PM
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Help installing 220 receptacle for range

I recently removed a built in stove which was hard wired. I would now like to install a receptacle to plug in a new free standing electric range using (hopefully) the same wiring. The current wire is hooked up to my electrical box with 2-40amp breakers attached together (2 pole?). The wire coming out of the wall that I would like to attach a receptacle to has the following verbiage on it "capwire alum 6/3 type se cable style u type RHW CDRS. 300v to ground". It has three wires--a black wire that looks like it has been painted red, a black wire, and non-insulated silver wire.
The stove I am buying says use a 40 amp cord/plug. The store where I bought the stove said use a 3-wire 40 amp plug which I have purchased.
When looking at range receptacles at my local "big box" store they only have 30amp or 50amp. Which one should I use or is there a 40amp receptacle I need? The receptacles also are either 3 wire or 4 wire....I assume I use a 3-wire?
Any advice and or concerns about the above would also be appreciated.
THANKS!!!!!
 
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Old 02-27-07, 09:00 PM
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The simple answer is to buy the receptacle that your plug will fit into. That should be a 50-amp receptacle. 40-amp ranges are typically wired to 50-amp receptacles on 40-amp breakers. All this is allowed by code.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 03:32 PM
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John, what about this part:


Originally Posted by indigocarrot View Post
The wire coming out of the wall that I would like to attach a receptacle to has the following verbiage on it "capwire alum 6/3 type se cable style u type RHW CDRS. 300v to ground". It has three wires--a black wire that looks like it has been painted red, a black wire, and non-insulated silver wire.
Doesn't most 220v systems have red, black, white and green wire? (hot, hot, neutrel and ground) Can he use the existing wire?
 
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Old 02-28-07, 03:40 PM
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That was my next question, now that I have purchased a 3-wire receptacle. The instructions on the receptacle say to attach the two hot wires (I assume red and black) to their respective screws. It goes on to say, connect the neutral wire to its respective screw. The instructions mention nothing about a ground wire. I don't believe the current wire I have has a neutral wire. Isn't the non-insulated silver wire a ground? Should that be connected as a "neutral"?
Thanks for the help it is very much appreciated!!!!
 
  #5  
Old 02-28-07, 03:54 PM
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> Isn't the non-insulated silver wire a ground?

The braided aluminum part of the cable is actually the neutral. A 3-wire range hookup is technically ungrounded.

> Doesn't most 220v systems have red, black, white and green wire?
> (hot, hot, neutrel and ground) Can he use the existing wire?

It's somewhat of a grey area. All new range and dryer circuits must have four wires, but you are allowed to re-use three wire hookups from an existing installation. When remodeling, you are required to upgrade to meet the modern four wire code; but the difference between "replacing the stove" and "remodeling" is hard to define. Some people would say the circuit must be replaced, others would say it is okay to add the 3-prong receptacle to the existing cable.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 04:02 PM
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I don't think many inspectors would treat an appliance replacement as a condition mandating updating to conform to current code.

Pur 240-volt appliances need no neutral and don't even have a place to connect a neutral. Some ranges sold today are pure 240-volt appliances, and some are 240/120. All ranges sold are designed to be connected to either the old 3-wire circuits (pre 1996), or to the newer 4-wire circuits (post 1996). And they come with two sets of instructions, one for each.

If you have a 4-wire circuit (post 1996), and you have a 240/120 appliance, you are required to use all four wires, and required to follow the 4-wire instructions and use a 4-wire cord and plug.

The most common example of a pure 240-volt appliance in your home that uses no neutral is an electric water heater. It is always (except in Chicago) wired with 10/2 (black, white, ground), where the black and white are the hots and the bare is the ground.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 09:24 PM
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Cool Massachusetts!

I don't think many inspectors would treat an appliance replacement as a condition mandating updating to conform to current code.##

If here, do your homework. Move the old one out,and under the cover of darknes! Do not leave it on the curb! Not all areas, But some.

Trust me.
 
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