changing a 220 outlet to 110?

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-27-07, 06:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 423
changing a 220 outlet to 110?

I have removed a small built-in oven that was powered by 220. The feed consists of 4-wires. the GREEN is 12 ga., & the RED, WHITE, & BLACK are 10 ga. I would like to replace the circuit breaker with a single 110v 20 amp, and my question is, WHICH WIRES DO I USE, and which one will NOT be used? I know the GREEN is my ground.

At present the breaker is wired with the RED, & BLACK, and the WHITE is hooked to a bar above. Of course the GREEN is hooked to the ground bar.

Thanks,


Dale
Indy
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-27-07, 07:08 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Use either the black or the red as the hot wire. The white will remain as it is now, the neutral. Cap the wire you do not use on both ends and tuck it out of the way.
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-07, 07:13 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 423
Smile

Thank You.


Dale
Indy
 
  #4  
Old 02-27-07, 07:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
One more note. The 10 gage wires may not fit under the screw terminals on the receptacle. If they do not fit, then use 12 gage pigtails to make the connections.
 
  #5  
Old 02-27-07, 08:34 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 423
Smile

Just use a section of 12 ga. and wire nut to the 10? I have always wrapped tape around the wire nut to aid in preventing such from backing off, is that a good thing to do?

Thanks,


Dale
Indy
 
  #6  
Old 02-27-07, 08:42 PM
1Geniere's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 113
Originally Posted by Smith Brother View Post
…I would like to replace the circuit breaker with a single 110v 20 amp…
I’m not an electrician but why throw a circuit away. I’d convert it to two 120vac circuits. Replace the existing (30amp?) 2-pole breaker with a 20amp 2-pole breaker (Wire it exactly as the original) or 2 single pole breakers (black to one; red to the other).

On the oven end, install a two-gang box and 2 GFCI’s.

- Using a wire nut connect 2 white wires (12-gauge, 6-inch long) to the white wire from breaker panel.
- Connect one of the white wires to each GFCI’s neutral line input.
- Connect the red wire to one GFCI’s line input and the black wire to the other GFCI’s line input.

- Pigtail grounds to each GFCI.

Use the deepest box you can get because it is hard to fit two GFCI’s in the box with 12-gauge wire. Don’t run the white wires from one GFCI to the other; you must pigtail from the source white wire. You can use 15amp GFCI’s but they wont accept a 20amp appliance plug.

Steve
 
  #7  
Old 02-28-07, 04:24 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Very few appliances have 20 amp cord and plugs or require a 20 amp circuit.

I did not suggest two circuits because this would be a multi-wire circuit. Multi-wire circuits have very specific rules and requirements, and are not for novices.
 
  #8  
Old 02-28-07, 05:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 423
Smile

This 110 outlet is going to be used for a on the counter microwave. I have a couple more outlets in the area, so one is all I need at present.

I do THANK YOU for all the info, I have printed such and will keep in my files.

I like the help this site provides.

Dale
Indy
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'