Bathroom Outlet

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Old 02-28-07, 07:02 PM
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Bathroom Outlet

Does a bathroom GFCI outlet need to be on a dedicated circuit ?

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Old 02-28-07, 07:10 PM
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The bathroom needs a dedicated 20 amp circuit, and it must be GFCI protected, I belive you also need a speareat lighting circuit too but i dont have my code book with me right now
 
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Old 02-28-07, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by swallman View Post
Does a bathroom GFCI outlet need to be on a dedicated circuit ?

Thanks!
Actually, let me expand on my question a bit. We are finishing the attic of our home into living space and had to be "creative" with the bathroom. The shower and toilet are in a room of their own (with a door). I want to put an outlet in this room (close to floor) for the possibility of a plug-in tower warmer.

The sink it outside of this room in the open space of the attic. It will have a GFCI outlet located near the sink.

Can I put the outlet in the enclosed portion of the bath on the same GFCI circuit ? This would be a dedicated 20 amp circuit in the panel.

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-28-07, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by burkej62 View Post
The bathroom needs a dedicated 20 amp circuit, and it must be GFCI protected, I belive you also need a speareat lighting circuit too but i dont have my code book with me right now
Can someone confirm on the lighting circuit ? Sounds like a lot of extra work for a single fixture.
 
  #5  
Old 02-28-07, 07:41 PM
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The bathroom and kitchen are the two most electrically regulated rooms in your house. So it's not possible for me to tell you everything you need to know. You've probably noticed how often we recommend the book "Wiring Simplified". You need it too.

The simplest approach do is to dedicate one 20-amp circuit on 12-gauge wire to power everything in a single bathroom, with nothing outside that one bathroom on the circuit. All receptacles in a bathroom must have GFCI protection. The receptacle near the sink must be no farther than 36 inches away from the rim of the sink.

So, yes, the two receptacles can be on the same circuit. And no, you do not need a separate circuit for the lighting.

This is not your only option, but it is the one most commonly used for bathrooms remodels.
 
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