How do I convert a Switched receptacle to always on?

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  #1  
Old 03-06-07, 11:16 AM
J
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How do I convert a Switched receptacle to always on?

I would then like to make that switch work for some lights I have not installed yet.
Power goes to that receptacle from the switch only and only 1/2 of the receptacle is swithced.

I know that I have to run wire form the switch to the new lights but not sure about the connections for making the recetacle always on and getting power fed to it from the switch locations.

Please help.
Thanks in advance
Jay
 
  #2  
Old 03-06-07, 11:31 AM
R
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The answer depends on the current wiring at the switch and at the receptacle. Since you haven't told us what that is, we can't answer provide an answer.
 
  #3  
Old 03-06-07, 12:04 PM
J
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See http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=296957

Answer the seven questions in the third post. Your solution will not be exactly the same unless all your answers are also the same.
 
  #4  
Old 03-06-07, 12:26 PM
J
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Answers

(1) After I'm done, I would like the currently switched receptacle to be:
(1A) Still controlled by the same switch that controls the new overhead light.
(1B) Always hot, independent of the switch.
(1C) Either way is fine.

ALWAYS HOT


(2) There is an accessible attic above this room.
(2A) True.
(2B) False.
TRUE, That is how wire is led down to that receptacle from the switch.

(3) It would be easier to fish a new cable:
(3A) From the ceiling to the switch.
(3B) From the ceiling to the receptacle.
(3C) How the heck would I know?

3A

(4) The switch and the receptacle:
(4A) Neither is on an exterior wall.
(4B) Both are on an exterior wall.
(4C) The switch only is on an exterior wall.
(4D) The receptacle only is on an exterior wall.

Switch is on an interior wall, switched recep is on an exterior wall

(5) The switch currently controls:
(5A) Only the top half of the duplex receptacle.
(5B) Only the bottom half of the duplex receptacle.
(5C) Both halves of the receptacle.

5A

(6) There is a white wire connected to one of the screws on the switch.
(6A) True.
(6B) False.

True

(7) The lever of the switch:
(7A) Says "on" and "off".
(7B) Is blank.

7A regulare 15a switch not a 3 way.


Is that all you guys need to know?
 
  #5  
Old 03-06-07, 01:27 PM
J
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Yes, that's all the information we need ... almost. I forgot to ask whether the breaker is a 15-amp or a 20-amp breaker.

I recommend you buy a new receptacle. You can make the current receptacle work, but it has the tab removed on the hot side and it will be more work and more confusion to make it work. I'll be simpler to install a new receptacle with the tab already in place.
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-07, 09:22 PM
J
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Sorry to be slow getting back to this. I got busy with other things.

I'll give you the first piece of the puzzle while waiting for the answer to my most recent question.

First, go out and buy the new receptacle. Then shut off the breaker.

If at any time, you find something other than what I describe, stop and post back before proceeding.

Open up the receptacle box and pull out the receptacle. Carefully record all connections, just in case. Remove the receptacle by disconnecting all the wires from it. Save the old receptacle, just in case.

Somewhere in the back of the box, you should find one black wire and one white wire connected together with a wire nut. Remove the wire nut and separate the wires.

Now you should be left with two black wires, two white wires, and two bare wires still connected together with a pigtail that used to be connected to the green screw on the old switch.

Connect the two black wires to the two brass screws on your new receptacle. Connect the two white wires to the two silver screws on your new receptacle. Connect the grounding pigtail to the green screw. Repack everything back into the box, making sure that the bare wires don't touch any of the screws.

Go to the switch box. Pull out the switch and record all the connections, just in case. You should see only three wires in the box, one white, one black and one green, all of which are connected to the switch. There should be no extra wires in the box that I have not listed.

Remove the three wires from the switch. Just for now, put two wire nuts separately on the black and white wires (to isolate them), and pack all wires back into the box. Save the switch for later use, and put the switch plate cover back on the box (for safety). You may now turn the breaker back on so that you will have power while waiting to complete the rest of the job.

Post back when you get this far.
 
 

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