fridge circuit

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  #1  
Old 03-07-07, 07:49 AM
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fridge circuit

I've already decided what I'm going to do. Just looking for any reasons why I shouldn't. I've always been told, a refridgerator should be on it's own 20A circuit. while doing some outlet moving for an addition, I've dicovered that my fridge is wired with 14 guage wire. My fridge only draws 7.7 amps. I want to keep the wire, and replace the circuit breaker with a 15. Any problems with that?
 
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  #2  
Old 03-07-07, 08:01 AM
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Yes, by all means replace the circuit breaker with a15 amp one if it is presently 20 amps. 14 gage wire on a 20 amp circuit is wrong.

A 15 amp circuit is fine for most residential refrigerators. Certainly I would always recommend a 20 amp circuit if installing a new one, but I certainly would not rewire just to make it so, unless the refrigerator specifically called for it.
 
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Old 03-07-07, 09:33 AM
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Definitely install the 15A breaker!

Energy efficiency of refrigerators has improved enough that even the largest residential side-by-sides will run just fine on a 15A circuit. Code allows a single appliance to draw up to 80% of the circuit capacity continuously. Therefore, you would be fine with a fridge up to 12A.
 
  #4  
Old 03-07-07, 02:51 PM
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thanks, I've also discovered all my 20A circuits in the kitchen have 14 guage wire. I left the fridge and microwave on 15A circuits. everything else has been replaced. the microwave draws 12.9A. now that I've seen the last post I may go ahead and replace that also.
 
  #5  
Old 03-07-07, 02:58 PM
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I would not lose sleep over your microwave circuit or rush to upgrade it to 12 gage wire. A microwave is not a continuous duty appliance. Pulling 12.9 amps through a 15 amp circuit for the amount of time that a microwave is running will not create a fire hazard.
 
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Old 03-07-07, 03:54 PM
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A refrigerator isn't a continuous duty appliance either.
 
  #7  
Old 03-08-07, 03:03 AM
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very well, I've never had a problem the18 years I,ve been here. can,t see why they would start now. the microwave also shared an outlet on it's circuit and I've eliminated that. thanks for your help.
 
  #8  
Old 03-08-07, 03:41 AM
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new question. Not that money is an issue, but I hate spending it when I don't have to. I have a double pole 15A breaker that I freed up when I eliminated an A/C. could I use this for the fridge and microwave? I realize that if one tripped the other would go, but I don't see a problem with this. It doesn't appear that the bridge between the toggles is removable.
 
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Old 03-08-07, 09:34 AM
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Yes, you may use either or both poles of the 15A breaker. Just think is the risk of losing a fridge full of food worth the $8 it would cost to buy two single pole breakers? If you really want to re-use the DP 15A, put some other lighting circuit on it with the microwave so the fridge can have its own single pole.
 
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Old 03-08-07, 05:58 PM
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I've already decided what I'm going to do.

Thats the wrong way to look for advice.
 
  #11  
Old 03-08-07, 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by bumpah View Post
I've already decided what I'm going to do. Just looking for any reasons why I shouldn't. I've always been told, a refridgerator should be on it's own 20A circuit. while doing some outlet moving for an addition, I've dicovered that my fridge is wired with 14 guage wire. My fridge only draws 7.7 amps. I want to keep the wire, and replace the circuit breaker with a 15. Any problems with that?

Actually, to comply with NEC and to not cause a fire, that circuit should be on a 15 amp circuit anyway, if it is 14 awg wire. if your fridge only draws 7.7 amps total and nothing else is on the circuit, you should be safe, if not, you need to wire a new circuit, but nonetheless, that circuit should be 15 amp due to the size of the wire.
 
  #12  
Old 03-09-07, 03:21 PM
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I would double check to make sure all your 14 gauge wirring is protected by a 15 amp breaker, I have seen many odd and unsafe things involving branch circuits protected by hideosuly oversized breakers. Like #14 mulitwire on a 30 amp double poll
 
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