Under the countertop.

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  #1  
Old 03-19-07, 10:14 PM
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Under the countertop.

Hi all. Got a few questons. I have been tracing and looking at the wiring in my house just to see what kind of condition its in. Under the kitchen countertop I have found a 20A single receptacle that was probably put in at one time for a microwave. There is a hole in the countertop big enough to pass a plug through that leads to it. From the receptacle there is a conduit that goes to a junction box just under it in the basement. There is #12 wire in it. It is dedicated and goes to a 15A breaker. Does this sound ok?

Another thing that I have found is a junction box under the countertop directly under the stove. It has a pretty big wire that goes from it to another junction box in the basement and is connected with the wire from the range. Then the wire that powers both the stove and the range goes from the juncton box to the load center to a 40A breaker. Does this sound ok?
I already see that I will have to work on this circuit some. The junction box in the basement has no cover and it looks like the wires are soldered then taped.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-20-07, 04:29 AM
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While you can certainly have a receptacle under the counter top, using it for something on the counter top is at best a code violation in spirit. Sounds like someone was too lazy to wire a new circuit properly and took what they perceived to be a shortcut. The 20 amp receptacle on a 15 amp breaker is a code violation.

I would not use this circuit for anything above the counter. I would not use the circuit for anything under the counter until I changed the receptacle to be a 15 amp one or the breaker to be a 20 amp breaker.

Powering the range and the stove (it sounds like they are two different appliances?) on a single circuit is wrong. I would run the appropriate sized new circuit for each appliance from the panel. Multiple junction boxes for splices is asking for trouble.
 
  #3  
Old 03-20-07, 01:25 PM
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Thanks racraft. You've pretty much stated what I was expecting. I actually plan on using the receptacle under the countertop. Everything else in the kitchen (except the range, stove and dishwasher) is on one circuit including the lights. The circuit breaker is 15A. When I use a toaster oven and a microwave together the breaker will trip. This is why someone probably added the receptacle. I will change the breaker for it to 20A. Just wondering, wouldnt the 15A breaker currently installed for that receptacle actually be safer since it will trip before a 20A?

The stove and oven are 2 different appliances located in different places in the kitchen. They are going to be totally rewired on their own circuits.
 
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Old 03-20-07, 01:30 PM
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While your at it, you may want to see how much more trouble it would be to add 2 seperate counter ckts.
 
  #5  
Old 03-20-07, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by lectriclee View Post
While your at it, you may want to see how much more trouble it would be to add 2 seperate counter ckts.
Yep. Most definetly in the near future. I just plan on using the undercounter receptacle temporarily. Until everything is straightened out. Including putting the lights on their own circuit.
 
  #6  
Old 03-20-07, 02:12 PM
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> I actually plan on using the receptacle under the countertop.

At the very least, make sure the receptacle is a GFCI.
 
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