Serving several outlets from one jbox

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-21-07, 04:56 PM
Q Brizzle's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern Wisconsin
Posts: 110
Serving several outlets from one jbox

This question came up when looking at my kitchen wiring. I'm in the middle of a remodel, and wondered about this.

In my case, I'm removing cupboard soffits, since the new cupboards will be full-height (versus the wimpy short ones that used to hang from the soffits). The builder did not run the cable for the outlets down through the top plate as they should have. Rather, they ran them through the soffit, then into the wall cavities. So when I removed the soffit, I had cables coming from the attic into the wall cavity, but not through the top plate of the wall.

I will correctly run the cables through the top plate when it's re-wired. But one question:

- can I simply serve 2 or 3 outlets (this is 12-2 wire, 20A circuits) from one big jbox in the attic?

This would save me from having to drill holes from stud to stud (and bust drywall) going from one outlet to the next. Normally, outlets are wired "daisy chained" until you reach the last one in the line. Is there anything wrong with making a "web" instead? So I'll have one "feeder" cable coming into the large jbox, but 3 going out...1 to each outlet.

Is there anything wrong with this...other than not being customary?

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-21-07, 04:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 5,667
Nothing wrong with that as long as the junction box is large enough for all the cables.
 
  #3  
Old 03-21-07, 05:18 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,618
The junction box MUST remain accessible. It cannot be covered up by the building surface, ie not behind drywall or the like.
 
  #4  
Old 03-21-07, 09:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,767
And if not already, the outlets need to be on two separate circuits.
 
  #5  
Old 03-22-07, 05:19 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
This is legal, if the junction box remains permanently accessible.

But I will ask why. A better solution, in my opinion, would be to run a wire back up to the attic from the first receptacle, then over and down to the next one, then up and over and down to the next, etc.

Every junction on a circuit is a potential failure point. Why introduce a junction box when you don't have to? A box in the attic is likely to be forgotten.
 
  #6  
Old 03-22-07, 08:06 AM
Q Brizzle's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern Wisconsin
Posts: 110
Thanks for the help!

It will be accessible from the attic only.

And the wire coming into the box is a 12/3, so it would need a jbox to split the two circuits anyway. One for the over-the-range microwave, and the other to feed that wall's outlets. At the service panel, the two hot legs are on separate 20A breakers on opposite phases.

Sounds like I'll be OK.

Thanks for the idea, racraft. It would be equally easy to run wire back up and down from the attic for each drop.
 
  #7  
Old 03-22-07, 08:38 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
No, you still do not need a separate junction box even though this is a multi-wire circuit. Just make the split at the microwave receptacle or at the first counter top receptacle.
 
  #8  
Old 03-22-07, 09:27 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 247
Is it possible to dig holes horizontally, instead of going up and down?
You may have to redo the ceramic tiles on the wall.
 
  #9  
Old 03-22-07, 09:53 AM
Q Brizzle's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern Wisconsin
Posts: 110
Yes it is possible to break drywall (and the wacky super-strong concrete coating over it) and drill through the studs from new outlet to new outlet...but I'm not interested in all the patchwork. If I can do it the "distributed" method, that will save me time and work.
 
  #10  
Old 03-22-07, 10:53 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 247
I agree. but you'd better check if there are any horizontal studs while you snail cables downwards. (between your top plates and the outlet boxes.)
If so, you have more holes to drill and more patches to do.
 
  #11  
Old 03-22-07, 05:10 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
Additionaly, There is/ was nothing wrong with the original install.

Very common method. For the record.
 
  #12  
Old 03-22-07, 06:44 PM
Q Brizzle's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern Wisconsin
Posts: 110
Thank you!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes