Dishwasher cord ?

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Old 03-23-07, 05:32 PM
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Dishwasher cord ?

Hi, I just purchased a new kenmore d/w. I distinctly asked the sales rep if the cord for "plug in" use was supplied. I was told it was, but not wired. I understood that to mean the cord & male plug were supplied but not yet attached to the appliance. (what a mistake) . Long story short, I don't live that close to the BIG DEPT STORE and the instruction sheet says I should go purchase the #16AWG cord from them. My question is: Instead, can I use #12NM with ground, that I have plenty of and add the appropriate male plug to the end? The appliance end has it's own metal box with a black wire, white wire, and a green grounding screw to make connections to. They at least supplied the hole to pass the wire thru! - THANKS!
 
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Old 03-23-07, 06:39 PM
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Bob, no you can't use 12-2 NM-B with a plug, and I would be a little leery of using 16 gauge wire on a dishwasher. I would obtain some 14-2 wg or 12-2 wg, SO cable, attach a plug and attach it to the box under the dishwasher.
 
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Old 03-23-07, 06:44 PM
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Thanks Larry,
I kinda knew i was going to be told that,.....but just thot i would take the chance and ask the pros. Better to ask. I'll get the new wire in the morning.
 
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Old 03-23-07, 08:19 PM
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Just to add to Chandlers post, ALL correct. But the so/j cord you want is 14/3-12/3-- They do count the ground wire, In this type of cable. Get 1 Hot-1(wht)neutral- and 1 green- NO LESS than #14.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 05:03 AM
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Just one note. If the manufacturer specifies (and in fact sells) a 16 gage cord then a 16 gage cord is acceptable. Now I would certainly buy a larger gage cord if this were my house, but what the manufacturer calls for is appropriate unless a local code overrules it.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 06:39 AM
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This was copied from another forum. It explains the requirements to install a cord on a dishwasher. I wonder how many licensed electricians are aware or are following this UL Standard.


UL Standard UL-749
UL 749
Household Dishwashers

7.3 Installation instructions

7.3.1A Where the installation instructions for a built-in dishwasher specifies
that the appliance is able to be connected by means of a power-supply cord
not already attached to the appliance by the manufacturer, the instructions
shall specify that a power-supply cord kit marked for use with dishwashers
shall be used. The cord kit shall comply wi th Clause 25.2A. The part or model
number of the power-supply cord kit shall be included in the appliance
installation instructions.
7.3.2 The installation instructions provided with a cord-connected undercounter appliance shall include
the following instructions or equivalent information:
a) the power-supply receptacle for the appliance shall be installed in a cabinet or on a wall
adjacent to the undercounter space in which the appliance is to be installed;
b) there shall be an opening through the partition between the compartments specified in (a) that
is large enough for the attachment plug to pass through. The longest dimension of the opening
shall not be more than 38 mm;
c) the edges of the opening specified in (b) shall, if the partition is wood, be smooth and rounded,
or, if the partition is metal, be covered with an edge protector provided for this purpose b y the
manufacturer; and
d) care shall be exercised, when the appliance is installed or removed, to reduce the likelihood of
damage to the power-supply cord.

25.2 Cord-connected appliances
25.2.1 The power-supply cord of an appliance provided with a means for grounding shall include an
equipment-bonding conductor and shall terminate in a grounding-type attachment plug.

25.2.4 For a cord-connected built-in appliance:
a) the flexible cord shall be Type S, SJT, SPT-3, or the equivalent; and
b) the length of the flexible cord shall be 0.9 – 1.2 m, measured from the face of the
attachment plug to the plane of the rear of the appliance.

25.2.5 The power-supply cord shall be attached permanently to the
appliance or shall be in the form of a separate cord supplied as part of a
power-supply cord kit with means for connection to the appliance. The
power-supply cord kit shall comply with Clause 25.2A.
25.2.6 The ampacity of the cord and the current rating of the fittings shall not be less than the current
rating of the appliance.
For an appliance rated more than 15 A, the current rating of the attachment plug shall not be less than
125% of the current rating of the appliance.
A 20 A plug shall be acceptable for an appliance rated not more than 4000 W at 240 V. The attachment
plug shall be acceptable for use at a voltage equal to the rated voltage of the appliance.
.

25.2A Power-supply cord kits for use with undercounter or built-in
dishwashers
25.2A.1 A power-supply cord kit intended for the installation of an
undercounter or built-in dishwasher shall include the following:
a) power-supp ly cord, strain-relief means, and push-back relief that complies
with Clause 25.2;
b) a part or model number marked on the power-supply cord kit package, or
in the kit installation instructions;
c) installation instructions; and
d) grounding instructions in accordance with Clause 7.2.2.4(a).
 
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Old 03-24-07, 07:26 AM
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I would call the Sears appliance manager and explain your situation. I would poitely ask them to have a courier drop one off at your home, seeing that you were told that it was included. If they cannot I would call the national customer service line, again, politely explain the siuation and ask them to overnight the part. If neither venue is productive I would no longer do business with their stores.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 07:51 AM
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Yanici:
Nice catch!
Basically you must use the only the cord with the part number specified by the manufacturer. This does not fall under the typical “minimum standard” of the NEC. Making or using a cord that meets a higher standard would not be in compliance. Correct?
 
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Old 03-24-07, 07:57 AM
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Juhl, not really my catch. Others way smarter than I are checking around. But, you seem to get the gist of it. If we need to use "factory" cords to comply, then I think the manufacturers should be required to supply them in the box the dishwasher comes in.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 08:11 AM
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It seems odd that using a cord of a higher standard would be prohibited. It seems manufactures have a lot of influence in how code and standards are written.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 08:47 AM
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UL stamp came with their part. They must provide it.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Juhl View Post
It seems manufactures have a lot of influence in how code and standards are written.
This is one reason why many local governments are begining to look to other standards than the NEC for thier code laws. And a topic for another thread.
 
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Old 03-25-07, 08:46 AM
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FWIW, all we've had were portable dishwashers, which are technically identical to theit "permanently installed" equals.

They came with 16/3 SJEW or SJTW cord assemblies pre-attached.
 
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Old 03-26-07, 08:57 AM
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Out of curiosity, are plug-in dishwashers really that common? I've owned 8 houses, all with dishwashers, and every one was hard wired.
 
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Old 03-26-07, 09:06 AM
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md2lgyk, yes it's becoming more common to cord connect a built in dishwasher. Also, the same for garbage disposals.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 02:59 PM
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It sure makes it alot easier when they have the plug in cord to do any type of work on them. You can just unplug it instead of turning the power off.
 
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Old 03-11-08, 11:09 AM
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I have my diswasher wired in with a plug in end. I used 12-2 nmb yellow wire. Same as used for other electrical projects. What is the differnce between 12-2nmb and 12-2 wg so cable?
 
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Old 03-11-08, 01:35 PM
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SO cable is flexible, and the plug cap is approved for use with SO cable, not MNB cable. NMB cable is designed/approved only for fixed installation to your house wiring.
 
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Old 03-11-08, 03:54 PM
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Wow, this is an old post.

My $.02.

It seems like they are making everything "plug-in" now. Ranges, dishwashers, disposals, furnaces/air handlers, range hoods, 240v space heaters, sprinkler controllers, etc.

I've heard they're even making light fixtures plug-in, I suppose so that they are easy to change or remove for cleaning, painting, etc. (not just shop lights, but living space lights too.) Not sure if this is happening in the US yet.

A few advantages: "handyman" installers can "wire" them without having to be an electrician. The appliance can be replaced without messing with or damaging the permanent wiring. A disconnect can be provided without an additional switch. Finally, there is less chance for a wiring error.

A disadvantage that comes to mind is cost. $7-$20 for a cord is more expensive than a piece of NM cable. Also, you are making more splices/connections which create resistance and can fail.

Finally, if you don't use the manufacture's cable, be aware of the temperature rating of the cord you use. I've seen 105° appliance cords, but 60° general purpose replacement cords.
 
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