Massachusetts bath light Code?

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Old 03-24-07, 08:38 AM
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Massachusetts bath light Code?

We are putting a bath in our basement. Does anyone know if in Massachusetts the bath lights can be on the same circuit as other lights in the basement or does it need to be dedicated to meet Code. Thanks!
 
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Old 03-24-07, 09:40 AM
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Ma.

Yes, everything in the bath can be on the same 20A ckt.

This ckt MUST supply the bathroom ONLY,including the lights.
Building code requires that at least 1 light NOT be GFCI protected.They don't want you in the dark on a trip.
I usualy protect the vanity and shower light, and leave the fan/light combo not protected.

Depending on the size of the bathroom, some inspectors let this slide.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 10:19 AM
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Thanks for such a quick reply! Our bathroom will be rather small, so it'll just have a vanity and fan/light. I thought that the receptacle had to be on its own ckt and GFCI, and was hoping that the lights could tie into a nearby 15A ckt. But if all the bathroom can be on the 20A, that's even better!

Question: the Stanley Wiring book I was reading said that lights need to be on a 15A ckt or their thin wires could burn before tripping the breaker. Is that info outdated, or is there something special we need to do in connecting the lights? Sorry for my lack of knowledge!
 
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Old 03-24-07, 11:05 AM
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lectriclee offers one way to do it, and it is the most common way for a new basement bathroom.

But yes, you may put the bathroom lights on the same circuit as other lights in the basement. However, if you do, the bathroom receptacle may not be on this same circuit.

So you can do it either of the two ways you were thinking of.

There is no national code that requires that lighting be on a 15-amp circuit. There are millions of light fixtures in the U.S. happily and legally and safely operating on 20-amp circuits. It seems common that writers of mass-marketed home wiring books make things up as they see fit.

I am not aware of the code that lecriclee mentioned that requires that one light in the bathroom must not be GFCI protected. As far as I know, you are allowed to GFCI protect absolutely everything in your house if you want to (although this isn't a particularly good idea).
 
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Old 03-24-07, 11:45 AM
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Building code-- MA.

The non GFI light is part of building code not the NEC.Bathrooms in MA. are the same as In the NEC.

Then there are towns with codes for post lights if the house is 40' or more off of the street. Not in the electric but in the building code.

This is why I suggest you check ALL codes.

My mistake. This is in the MEC, I got confused with another Bath issue.

MEC-210.70 (D)

"GFCI Protection of lighting outlets in all occupancies.The operation of a single GFCI device shall not deenergize all lighting outlets in a given area."


http://www.mass.gov/
 

Last edited by lectriclee; 03-24-07 at 07:27 PM. Reason: edit web site-Adjust the answer.
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