Question about powering rope lighting....

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  #1  
Old 04-06-07, 03:56 AM
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Question about powering rope lighting....

I custom make poker tables and recently bought rope lighting to incorporate into one of my tables. Having little electrical knowledge, I accidentally bought 12v rope lighting instead of 120v rope lighting. Anyway, the lighting came with a power cord with no "plug" end attached. This doesn't help be because this was the intent (to plug it into a standard wall outlet).

With this given situation, what steps/parts are needed to make 12v lighting plug into a standard 120v wall outlet?...and what can I expect to pay for parts?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 04-06-07, 04:09 AM
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If it is 12V and has not tranformer attached or included, you can't plug it in to house power. It needs a transformer or power supply to convert house power, like those that come with so many electronic gadgets these days. Check the directions that came with it, there should be some information.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 05:04 AM
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Most rope lighting intended for use in a home has transformers and attachment plugs that are made by the same mfg available (though possibly sold seperately)

If your rope light is intended for use on a car or boat, I would check with the mfg regarding its use attached to wood.

While the NEC does not cover pool tables, in this case this is a bad thing as we have no regulatory guildance on the proper installation. You will need to get your answers from the mfg.

I would not reccomend using anything other than OEM parts, unless it is approved by them, or part of thier listing/labeling (instruction books count as labeling)
 
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Old 04-06-07, 06:03 AM
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A doorbell transforner sounds like its what you need. Can you tell use the input specs on this rope lighting? Being as it is low voltage , I would not be to worried, as long as your primarys ar properly connected , secure and covered.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 06:24 AM
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Most big box stores will carry chime transformers not door bell transformers. They are 17v not 12v and not intended for a continuous load. I would question if they would be appropriate in this situation. We also don't know from the OP's post if AC will work. If the bulbs in the rope are LED it may need DC.

The best solution would seem to be to return them and get the correct one. Failing that and if no suggestion from the manufacturer I'd suggest a transformer for 12v halogen lights or 12v dc "wall wart".
 
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Old 04-06-07, 06:43 AM
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A doorbell transformer may have the correct voltage, but probably not the correct wattage. When you buy a transformer, make sure you validate both of these.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by burkej62 View Post
A doorbell transforner sounds like its what you need. Can you tell use the input specs on this rope lighting? Being as it is low voltage , I would not be to worried, as long as your primarys ar properly connected , secure and covered.
The wattage is 3 watts per foot - I need about 19 ft to do the job.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by burkej62 View Post
A doorbell transforner sounds like its what you need. Can you tell use the input specs on this rope lighting? Being as it is low voltage , I would not be to worried, as long as your primarys ar properly connected , secure and covered.

Why is it that people assume that low voltage is safer than line voltage?

It is amperage that causes fires, not voltage. The lower the voltage, the higher the amps.

This is purhaps a sound assumption when the low voltage supplies mili amps to something, but rope lights, or cabinet lights are not low amperage.

The fact that it is amperage that causes the fires, and people assume low voltage is safe makes for a bad mix.

People should learn and understand the concepts about electrical installations before they do things that could harm thier families.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 11:04 AM
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You admit that you bought the wrong parts, and that you know little about electricity. Your customer is expecting a first class job so wouldn't it make sense to get a U.L. approved 120 volt system and do the job right. Your future business depends on satisfied customers and jury rigging the electrics is not a good idea.
 
  #10  
Old 04-06-07, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
You admit that you bought the wrong parts, and that you know little about electricity. Your customer is expecting a first class job so wouldn't it make sense to get a U.L. approved 120 volt system and do the job right. Your future business depends on satisfied customers and jury rigging the electrics is not a good idea.
Point taken. If this is considered "rigging" which sounds as unprofessional as you imply, then I will buy the correct rope light for this application. I just thought there might be a sound way to power the lights I originally bought. I did not expect to get a crash course in electric by building poker tables.
 
  #11  
Old 04-06-07, 11:19 AM
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A typical doorbell transformer supplies only 10 watts. You can buy beefier doorbell transformers that supply up to 30 watts. You need 60 watts.

As has been stated by others, it would be much better to return this one and buy the one you wanted in the first place.

P.S. As jwhite says, low voltage is not necessarily any safer when it comes to the potential for fire, but it is safer when it comes to the potential for electrocution. Nevertheless, I almost never use low voltage when a line-voltage product is available.
 
  #12  
Old 04-11-07, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
A typical doorbell transformer supplies only 10 watts. You can buy beefier doorbell transformers that supply up to 30 watts. You need 60 watts.

As has been stated by others, it would be much better to return this one and buy the one you wanted in the first place.

P.S. As jwhite says, low voltage is not necessarily any safer when it comes to the potential for fire, but it is safer when it comes to the potential for electrocution. Nevertheless, I almost never use low voltage when a line-voltage product is available.
Purchased the UL approved 120v rope lighting and the table looks amazing. I wish I could add a pic to this reply to show you how it came out. Thanks again!
 
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