Cord length on appliances

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Old 04-10-07, 05:47 PM
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Cord length on appliances

I just got a final inspection done on one of the houses I was wiring up and I passed... however the electrical inspector did mention one thing about how long the cord was on the dishwasher. He said that he would let me slide because it was a stupid rule in his opinion... however, he mentioned that on dishwashers, the cord cannot be shorter that 18" or longer than 36" from the point it emerges from the cabinet under the sink to where it gets plugged into the outlet. I have always left some extra length so that the dishwasher can be pulled out for servicing without having to remove the end of the cord and have never had an inspector say anything about it. I wasn't going to press the issue as he passed me, but when I asked him for future reference what the code reference was he said he didn't have it on him but it was in the NEC. I am curious if this is an actual code and if so what the article number is just so I can look it up. Anyway thanks in advance for anyone that knows an answer.

-Paul
 
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Old 04-10-07, 05:55 PM
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Well, there is a code for dishwasher cord length, but it isn't the one you cited. 422.16(B)(2)(2) requires the cord to be 3 ft to 4 ft measured from the face of the attachment plug to the plane of the rear of the appliance
 
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Old 04-10-07, 06:00 PM
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ahhhh.. the inspector let is slide, cause he could not remember the exact length of the cord either.

I am glad that the inspectors where I work carry thier code books with them
 
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Old 04-10-07, 06:02 PM
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I'm no electrician but I do know that if you extend the length of a line with an extension cord beyond a certain point you need to use a heavier cord or it will overheat.I guess it loses resistance.Anyway depending on just how much "extra length" you added to the dishwasher cord I supose theoretically you could have an issue.Though dishwashers run only a short period of time,they do have heating elements which will draw significant power during the various cycles.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 06:11 PM
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voltage drop on an so cord of 4 foot is nothing to be considered.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 07:11 PM
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OP states cord on dishwasher has an unspecified extra length.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 07:13 PM
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your inspector needs to carry his NEC with him. The dimensions he gave you apply to a garbage disposal.

Close, but no cigar.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 07:14 PM
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check this site out:

http://www.csgnetwork.com/voltagedropcalc.html

Let us know how much cord the OP would need to wadd up under the counter before voltage drop becomes a problem.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 07:20 PM
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spdavid, this isn't meant to be mean or insulting but you are posting along with several professional electricians.

jwhite is quite profficient and educated. I see he is trying to teach you so you would do well to listen to his advice.

(btw; as a wire gets longer, the resistance becomes greater)
 
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Old 04-10-07, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by nap View Post
your inspector needs to carry his NEC with him. The dimensions he gave you apply to a garbage disposal.

Close, but no cigar.
My 2005 code book, titles this section as "Built-in Dishwashers and Trash Compactors."

It does not have seperate measurements for each.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 07:42 PM
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Out of curiosity, why wouldn't you just place a receptacle behind the unit and wire the unit with a standard 3-prong cord from a dishwasher hook-up kit?
 
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Old 04-10-07, 08:12 PM
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Thanks everyone for all the quick replies. Yes I agree the inspector should carry the code book with him. Although I had mine... I wasn't going to start say look you idiot I want proof of what your saying when he was saying was going to pass me when he felt he shouldn't... sometimes you've just gotta bite your tongue. Anyway the length I have is about 4.5' so I wouldn't get concerned about voltage drop or anything and sunroofguy... to answer your question the reason I don't put a receptacle behind it is because you sure don't want to get into an argument with the inspector about what is "accessible" in that particular town. Even having a code book and pointing out the definition leads to an argument with them. Although technically I think you legally can put one behind it by what John Nelson's Code reference states. Also thanks John for finding that reference.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by jwhite View Post
My 2005 code book, titles this section as "Built-in Dishwashers and Trash Compactors."

It does not have seperate measurements for each.
that's what I get for leaving my 05 NEC at work. I keep my last one ('99. I know. that was TWO cycles ago) by my chair at the house and generally reference that. Then some smart guy like you catches me on a change.

Thanks for making ME look like a dummy.



Just joking around. It's cool. Anyway, the "99" code lists the dimensions given. Maybe the inspector is a couple cycles behind in his head.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 08:43 PM
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again, per the 99 code, it does state you can put a recep behind the DW but it also states it must be accessible.

Sounds like a contradiction to me.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by nap View Post
spdavid, this isn't meant to be mean or insulting but you are posting along with several professional electricians.

jwhite is quite profficient and educated. I see he is trying to teach you so you would do well to listen to his advice.

(btw; as a wire gets longer, the resistance becomes greater)
Sorry I didn't realize it was problematic for someone who isn't a "professional" to participate or attempt to assist joe homeowner on this board.I am also sorry I don't know the NEC code book by heart or know what noone knew which was how much cord the OP had under his counter.And finally I didn't know I needed anyone's advice especially when it comes with a large barb attached.I won't bother you "professionals" again in this section.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 09:51 PM
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man are you sensitive. I was not intending to chase anybody away. Your arguments were of a very basic nature and not correct. I was merely trying to let you know that the rest of us (including the guy that was trying to teach you a bit) are pro's. That doesn't mean we know everything nor are we always correct.

It was also not meant to discourage you or anybody else from adding to the forum.

My apologies if I offended you. It was not meant to do so.
 
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Old 04-10-07, 10:53 PM
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A receptacle behind the dishwasher is definitely accessible. Don't let anybody tell you that it isn't. Take out two small screws and the dishwasher can easily be pulled out.

spdavid, welcome to the forum and we appreciate your contributions.
 
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Old 04-11-07, 08:01 PM
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yes, after careful consideration, it would be accessible but not readily accessible.

my mistake
 
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