Kitchen outlets

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  #1  
Old 04-11-07, 01:35 PM
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Kitchen outlets

I am redoing my kitchen. I am wondering what is the usual amount of outlets per 20 amp circuit in a kitchen. I am aware that code says I have to have 2 20 amp circuits and the dishwasher has to be on a dedicated service. How about my Refridge and microwave that is above my stove? Any feedback is greatly appreciated
 
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Old 04-11-07, 01:39 PM
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> what is the usual amount of outlets per 20 amp circuit in a kitchen.

Generally, I'd say about 4-5. Code does not specify a maximum number of receptacles per circuit in a residential setting. Code does, however, specify spacing. Receptacles along the kitchen countertop should be at most 4' apart and any countertop segment 12" or larger requires at least one receptacle. This also applies to island countertops.

> Refridge and microwave that is above my stove?

The fridge does not require a dedicated circuit, but it is a good idea to run one. A built-in microwave or microwave-rangehood requires a dedicated 20A circuit. Neither the fridge nor the microwave circuit should be GFCI protected.
 
  #3  
Old 04-11-07, 01:53 PM
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Ok sounds good, but one quick question. If I run 4 or 5 on one circuit am I able to use one GFI for that circuit and the rest of the outlets off that one GFI? I guess my real question is, how many outlets can be run off of one GFI before you have to introduce a new GFI into the line?
 
  #4  
Old 04-11-07, 02:00 PM
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A GFCI receptacle protects everything wired downstream from the LOAD terminals of the receptacle. There is no limit to the number of downstream receptacles a GFCI receptacle can protect.
 
  #5  
Old 04-11-07, 02:03 PM
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You need one GFCI per circuit. One GFCI cannot protect outlets on multiple circuits.

I strongly suggest you get the cheap green paperback, "Wiring Simplified", available at most home centers, libraries and on Amazon. It's less than $10, and clearly spells out all the kitchen codes. There are many more than we've mentioned so far in this thread, and there are options to choose from.
 
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