Switching two dryer outlets on single 240 circuit

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Old 04-15-07, 04:10 PM
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Switching two dryer outlets on single 240 circuit

Bought a house with dryer outlets on two floors. Both are stand-alone circuits, however one is dead-ended outside the panel and has never been connected. My panel is full, as is the sub-panel. I'd like to use a switch outside the box so that power from the single available 30 amp breaker could power each dryer outlet (one at a time of course.) Is this possible with a dpdt switch or by some other method?
 
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Old 04-15-07, 06:46 PM
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What's your panel? If thinner breakers are available (as for most modern panels), then the easiest solution by far is to just make room for another breaker.
 
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Old 04-15-07, 09:27 PM
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switching dryer outlets

I have a 200 amp main and a 70 amp sub, but the rated number of circuits is maxed out for each. I know adding another sub box would be a solution and there may be others, but I was hoping for input on my question about switching the circuits.
 
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Old 04-15-07, 10:09 PM
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I'm not sure if I've seen some suitable switches for that or not. And if so, a 6-space main lug subpanel might be about the same price.

But, if you trust yourself to just not run both at the same time, you could pigtail the wires together and land on the one breaker.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 11:46 AM
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switching dryer outlets

Thanks Mac. Is there any reason you can see why I couldn't use a switch designed for generators to prevent backfeed into the grid? They are designed to handle 240 at above that amperage and look like they can be wired to accomplish my purpose. Thanks again for your help.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 12:29 PM
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Using a transfer switch would most assuredly work but it would cost a fair amount of coin for that switch. You may be able to find one (like I did) surplus. I bought a 60 amp 3pole double throw switch for about $70. including the shipping cost. Retail price on that switch was about $600+.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 01:09 PM
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You might also be able to use a two pole double throw relay. Again though cost is the big factor. How ever one advantage is if you went with a low voltage coil you could easily run a control switch to the location of each receptacle. Still a new circuit really seems best for both simplicity and cost.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 01:15 PM
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You will find that a small sub panel may be cheaper than a transfer switch. The sub panel will also help when you need the next new circuit.

However, I prefer the suggestion just to wire them to the same breaker as the immediate solution.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 11:56 PM
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The average electric clothes dryer uses approx. 5000 watts. Section 210.23 prohibits the load served from exceeding the circuit rating. If the combined rating of these two dryers exceeds 7200 watts they cannot be served by a single 30 amp circuit.
 
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