200amp service

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  #1  
Old 04-18-07, 05:35 AM
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200amp service

We are having our service upgraded from 150 to 200amps. To save some cost, I would like to run the necessary service lines through our attic to the panel. The electrician will handle connecting everything up.

I intend to run a 2" PVC pipe with 3 x 2/0 copper wires and a #4 ground wire inside from the service entry area to the CB panel.

1. Is there a limit on the number of turns that can be taken? Our service comes in on the north side of the house, the panel is on the south side. We will need to take at least four 90 degree turns in order to run the PVC line from the circuit breaker panel, through the attic, through the north wall to the bottom of the disconnect switch/meter.
2. How often do you have to secure the PVC?
3. Is electrical PVC ok for this or is there reason to use metal for some of the run?

Since it is a long run, I was told that I need to also add an expansion joint. Also, a couple of people mentioned it would be good to put wire lube on the wires to make pulls easier. Any other tips on running this?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-18-07, 07:06 AM
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Are you talking about the service lines prior to the main breaker? Sorry, but you can't run those inside the structure.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-07, 07:33 AM
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No, the lines after the meter. Our circuit breaker panel is on the south side of the house, the service connection is on the north side.
 
  #4  
Old 04-18-07, 07:36 AM
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I don't care where the meter is. Where is the main breaker?
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-07, 07:51 AM
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one thing to the OP where you are located ??

the second thing is that you been describing this kind set up you are REQUIRED have a main breaker outside of the building because you say it will run thru the attic so it is automatically required by NEC codes

and please fix your profile to state the location it will make it more easier to tell ya where ya from.

Merci , Marc
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-07, 07:54 AM
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There will be a 200amp breaker outside the house at the service entrance after the meter. There is also a breaker at the circuit breaker panel. The cable that we are running are from the breaker outside the house to the circuit breaker panel. This is a distance of about 50'.
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-07, 06:08 PM
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I don't have a copy of the 2005 NEC but previously it was acceptable to have the disconnect some distance from where the service entered the premises IF the conduit was encased in no less than four inches of concrete. Of course LOCAL code could close this loophole.

I think it would easier to just install the disconnect at the point of service. It may also be feasible to move the service drop (utility wires) to the other side of the house, where the service panel is now. Consult your utility about this option.

It must always be remembered that the NEC is only recommendations and by itself has no force of law. It is the LOCAL code (which may be a city, county or state code) that has the force of law and must be followed. Usually the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ), which is the governmental body in your area administering building, mechanical, plumbing, electrical and other codes, will simply adopt as law the the NEC intact but sometimes they (the local AHJ) will make changes in the model code, either adding to, or deleting from, certain provisions.
 
  #8  
Old 04-19-07, 08:29 AM
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well

do you reallly need conduit to run SER through the attic?
 
  #9  
Old 04-19-07, 08:56 AM
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Johnb420, the issue is not whether or not SER may be run through an attic, with or without conduit. The question is where does the disconnect need to be.

The NEC is quite clear that the disconnecting means MUST be as close to the point where the conductors enter the premises as is practicable. The ONLY exception that I am aware of is the encasing of the conduit in the concrete I previously mentioned. When encased in no less than four inches of concrete the conduit (and the wires within) are considered to not be inside the premises.

This is, of course, subject to LOCAL codes.
 
  #10  
Old 04-19-07, 09:12 AM
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I will double-check with the local inspector, thanx for the input.

The reason we need to run the lines through the attic is that the current feed goes under the house and there is a significant possibility they may be tugged easily. This risk is what is driving up the costs for the work.

I want to run the lines in advance so that the electrician just has to connect them. This is a surer bet and will save me thousands in labor.

I understand that we will need to add a disconnect per code. The code changed since this was originally installed back in the 80's.
 
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