Color code for 220 V circuit wires

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-22-07, 07:59 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 46
Color code for 220 V circuit wires

What are the colors sanctioned by the NEC for a 2 wire + GND for a 220V circuit? both black? red and black? white and black? or all of the above?

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-22-07, 08:19 PM
nap's Avatar
nap
nap is offline
New Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: north
Posts: 4,163
there are very few color requirenments per NEC.

ground is green, bare copper, or green with yellow stripes

neutral is white, gray, or white with color stripes

in commercial use generally- high leg delta services the high leg is to be marked orange.

there are a few other obscure color requirements but that is it for the typical situations
 
  #3  
Old 04-22-07, 10:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,394
A common color code where I am is:

120/240 volt single phase
Black = left or upper bus
Red = right or lower bus
White = neutral (Code mandated)
Green = Equipment ground (Code mandated)

120/208 volt three phase
Black = left or upper bus, phase A
Red = middle bus, phase B
Blue = Right or lower bus, phase C
White = neutral (Code mandated)
Green = Equipment ground (Code mandated)

277/480 volt three phase
Brown = left or upper bus, phase A
Orange = middle bus, phase B
Yellow = Right or lower bus, phase C
Gray or White = neutral (Code mandated)
Green = Equipment ground (Code mandated)
 
  #4  
Old 04-23-07, 03:37 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
A 2 wire 120/240V circuit is going to be blk/wht, gnd, no other choices that I know of. 3 wire will be blk/red/wht. The wht wire should be marked blk to indicate it is hot.
 
  #5  
Old 04-23-07, 04:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 46
I am in the process of relocating my A/C outdoors unit uses 220V single phase and it is currently wired with alum #4 with two black wires + Gnd.

From the responses I got, it appears that I can do Blk and Red + Gnd or, Blk and Wht(wht with blk stripes on both ends)+ Gnd only. True?

Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 04-23-07, 04:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Just Bill's advice may be unclear or confusing.

When using individual conductors, you must use the appropriate color conductor. When using a cable assembly (such as 10-2, 14-3, etc.) you are allowed, in certain situations, to re-identify the white conductor as a hot wire by using colored tape or a colored marker. This allows you to use 10-2, for example, to supply power to a device that requires a 30 amp 240 colt circuit.


njarif,

In your case you have more to deal with than just the air conditioner. New installations, and this qualifies as a new installation, have additional requirements that must be met, such as a nearby 120 volt receptacle for service.

Further, you have aluminum wire which means that you must be careful. I recomend a brand new circuit from the main panel to the new location.
 
  #7  
Old 04-23-07, 06:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 46
Racraft

Thanks for the additional information. I plan to run new circuit with breaker and disconnect box using individual conductors in a conduit. Should I us Blk and Red for the hot wires and Grn for Gnd?

Thanks
 
  #8  
Old 04-23-07, 06:36 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Running a brand new circuit from your panel inside conduit, use green or bare for ground. For the hot wires you can use both black, both red, one of each, or any of several other colors, just not the ones that have been identified for neutral or ground wires.
 
  #9  
Old 04-23-07, 04:21 PM
nap's Avatar
nap
nap is offline
New Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: north
Posts: 4,163
although furds color schemes are typical, they are not required by the NEC. I have had them required by a specific job spec but that's it.



btw, the white with stripes refer to longitudinal stripes that are used to identify a neutral when multiple neutrals are used. If you have multiple hots (such as with a 240 v circuit) each hot must be anything other than green (with or without stripes), white or gray (with or without stripes) or bare metal.

Only a grounded conductor (commonly and often referred to as a neutral) is to be white or gray and only a grounding conductor is to be green or bare.

furd; what about high leg delta? corner grounded delta? (there are some mandates within each of those)
 
  #10  
Old 04-23-07, 04:31 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New Bern, NC
Posts: 1,623
corner ground delta, the corner is the "grounded conductor"

High leg delta, the high leg is "orange"
 
  #11  
Old 04-23-07, 05:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
what majorty of them in USA / Canada is very common with single phase colour code but three phase genreally pretty much the same but few locals may have slighty diffrent colour


wild leg delta useally are marked orange [ in very old days it was marked red ]

corner grounded delta two hot conductors typically any colour but third leg is always white

But when you mention european area the colour code will varies alot it is not the same as what you see in usa area at all

I do know few country[s] colour codes but right now i just will leave this out of the scope in here i dont want to compound it more than what we need to know .


Merci , Marc
 
  #12  
Old 04-23-07, 05:42 PM
nap's Avatar
nap
nap is offline
New Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: north
Posts: 4,163
I know you know that Jeff. I was picking on furd because he left them out. Nothing serious though.

long time no post french. the high leg orange is a code requirement now.

where do you you hail from anyway? always been curious.
 
  #13  
Old 04-23-07, 05:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Nap :

I am oringally from Paris France if case you want to know where i came from.

but one thing i will not dig up is very old colour code it will drive few peoples nutty with this one

if you want to know what the current european colour code now just ask me i will fill it out later

Merci , Marc
 
  #14  
Old 04-23-07, 06:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,394
Nap, I've only seen two delta secondary systems. The first was a 240 volt three-phase only system with the C phase at ground potential. It is derived from some kind of autotransformer that is fed from a four-wire, two-phase supply at 240 volts.

The other is a 240 volt three-phase system with one of the sides center-tapped to provide 240/120 volt single phase. The center tap is grounded. This one is from a 2,400 volt four-wire, two-phase system via a Scott transformer connection.

Both are in a 100 year-old former steam-electric generating station that is now a historical museum. The first system is still in use and is used with a rectifier to power the overhead crane while the second system was in use up until about a year and a half ago when one of the Scott transformers blew a winding.
 
  #15  
Old 04-23-07, 08:48 PM
nap's Avatar
nap
nap is offline
New Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: north
Posts: 4,163
Wow,I see. I run across center tapped/grounded delta's all the time and know of several corner grounded delta's in use with several of my customers.
I'm sure there are many I don;t even know about.

there used to be a lot of ungrounded deltas but POCO will not install those anymore.

I believe we have more systems and more of any one of those systems in use than just about anywhere else. Around here, you had better check 'cuz it could be just about anything.

You name it, we probably have it and I can probably tell you one of my customers that have it in their shop.
 
  #16  
Old 04-23-07, 10:03 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Nap:

We have alot of area still using Delta system as well but if you want to increase the size the poco will only increase the transformer rating to match the EXISTING main breaker. not for hevey up service anymore

and my poco's will not hook up delta any new comusters at all they will get wye system either 208Y/120 or 480Y/277 that it

we have few other spots have corner grounded in both 240 and 480 system and few with ungrounded [ useally in industrail area or other area that they cant shut down quick ]


but i know one or two location still using ole 2 phase system [ scott tee set up ] but one papermill use both AC and DC system due they have hydrodam right there so they can get both source pretty good but the cost to manatice the DC is more costy than AC is and the company is in planning to phase it out anway

Merci , Marc
 
  #17  
Old 04-24-07, 03:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
I apologize for my lack of clarity, I understand what I mean, while others may not. But you were talking about 10-2 cables, not indivdual wires, big difference.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'