Switch.. how to?

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-23-07, 10:56 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 22
Switch.. how to?

My electrician isn't coming over today to finish some simple stuff, but I have the know how to finish the wiring to the panel. My only problem are the switches. I don't know what to connect to what.

Here is one setup I have, if I get help on this one, I can figure out the rest.

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t279/BR-7/switch.jpg

Nothing special switch wise.. switch 1 is a signle pole operating one light, and switch 2 is the dimmer operating 8 cans. 14/2 romex was used.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-23-07, 11:01 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Any decent book on home wiring will give you ALL the information you need? Do you have one? If not, why not? If so, did you read it?

I think you should start at the beginning and give us ALL the information.

Why isn't the electrician finishing this?

Is this new wiring? new wiring in an existing setup?

What exists at the switch location? Cables with stripped wires? Cables without stripped wires? Are the lights wired?

Provide us ALL the information.
 
  #3  
Old 04-23-07, 11:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 22
Ah, sorry..

Dunno why he isn't showing up.. supposed to yesterday, was a no call/no show, so Im not banking on him to finish. He was here the other day and we started it and just have some minor stuff to finish. He's a friend of mine, err.. maybe an ex friend.

Its all new wiring. Im finishing the basement so its all new. All the basement wiring is running off the newly installed sub-panel. I pulled all the wiring for everything. We have one running circuit now (the rec room outlets), but the rest is ready to go.

All the outlets (on their respective circuits) are done. The cans are wired. Runs from the swithes to lights are done. Homeruns are done, etc etc.

I'm left with switches and wiring up the panel. Like I said above, I'm capable of doing the panel. I've done ALL of the work except hanging the sub-panel and getting the power to it from the existing panel and wiring up the rec room outlets in the newly installed panel. And now I know how to do the panel (via my soon to be ex-electrician friend).

So at the switch locations, I have stripped wires (14/2 romex) ready go. From that link to the image I posted is basically what I need to know. If I get that.. I can figure out the rest.

Lastly, no, I didn't get the book.

I'm sorta a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none.
 
  #4  
Old 04-23-07, 01:20 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Maybe it's true, but it's difficult to accept the assertion that you know how to wire a panel, but not how to wire a switch. Please ensure that you are being realistic about assessing your skills. Could it be that there are some very important details about wiring a panel of which you are completely unaware?

At the Switch 1, use a wire nut to connect the black wire from the panel to the black wire to Switch 2, and to a 4" segment of black wire (a "pigtail"). Connect the other end of the pigtail to one of the brass screws on the switch. Connect the black wire going to the light to the other brass screw on the switch. Connect all three white wires to each other with a wire nut. Connect all three bare wires to each other and to a bare pigtail to the green screw on the switch.

At Switch 2, connect both bare wires to the grounding wire on the dimmer. Connect both white wires to each other. Connect the two black wires, one each, to the two remaining wires on the dimmer.

Without having read a book, are you sure you know all the proper techniques of good workmanship?
 
  #5  
Old 04-23-07, 02:02 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 22
Thank you for the switch help. Much appreciated.


He showed me how to wire the homeruns into the panel. Not real difficult there. But the switches seem a tad more difficult on what to connect to where. The panel is a little more easier IMO... 3 wires.

As for the workmanship.. I can take pictures of the wire running through the joists & studs, at the outlets/switch boxes, the can light connections, homeruns, etc etc, if needed. I didn't "hack up" the joists or studs.. the holes are perfectly aligned.. the romex isn't twisted like a pretzel.. the cans are spaced evenly throughout the rec room.. everything runs straight down the length of the joist or stud.. why would you question workmanship because I never read an electical 'how too' book??
 
  #6  
Old 04-23-07, 02:08 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
John is NOT questioning workmanship in the way you are thinking.

John is questioning, for example, whether or not you have six inches of wire in each junction box from each cable, whether the cable insulation properly extends into the boxes, whether the cables are properly stapled attached to the studs, whether the wires are properly attached to the switches, how you are connecting the wires with wire nuts, whether the boxes are properly grounded (if metal), and a whole host of other issues that you almost certainly don't know about.
 
  #7  
Old 04-23-07, 02:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
The darn trouble with electrical work is that what you don't know can in fact hurt you. Not all the hazards in electrical work are readily evident, and common sense is not always enough. You can be very careful, very methodical, very organized, and very precise, and yet still be creating a latent safety hazard. Not everything that works is safe. Sometimes simple errors come back to bite you months or years later. All I'm asking is that you be realistic in assessing your skills. Maybe your work is perfect and, if so, my warnings are unnecessary. But I'd rather give an unnecessary warning than see someone get hurt.
 
  #8  
Old 04-23-07, 03:09 PM
Rainbird's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 373
I am curious, did you get a permit for this basement remodel? If not you should have. That way, your inspector could verify and sign off the work. Non-permitted work could cause problems with your homeowners insurance, if bad things should happen.

If you did pull a permit, get the inspector out to review the job and get his input. Most are happy to help and offer advice.
 
  #9  
Old 04-23-07, 04:17 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 22
Racraft.. understood.

I guess I can say I really didn't go into this without knowing absolutly nothing.. I did know some things. As for the panel wiring.. intimidating? Yes, very! But can I do it, yes indeed. Will I? Not sure yet, but if I have too, I will.

And yes, the work will be inspected when I get all the electrical done.
 
  #10  
Old 04-24-07, 01:00 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2
I have a question about your home runs BR-7. Are they all 14-2 or 12-2 , or did you pull some 14-3 , 12-3 ( do any of your cables have a black and red wire) If red wires are present and you dont know why I would be asking this please ask more questions.
 
  #11  
Old 04-25-07, 10:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 22
Jpreverso:

7 home runs.. (for now )

1 12/2 run.. (bathroom)
2 14/3 runs.. (smoke/carbon monoxide detectors - needed the extra wire to interconnect all 4 together, which I have 1 smoke only and the other 3 are smoke/co's and the other 14/3 run was for my hallway that operates 4 cans on a 3way switch.. one switch is upstairs in the stairway, the other switch at the end of the hallway downstairs.)

4 14/2 runs..

-------------------------------


John Nelson & racraft:

Just to follow up with you two, all the wiring is complete and 100% working. My electrician showed up later that day and we finished up. I ended up wiring all the switches with one flaw, lol.. I had the light feed on the wrong screw, but that was all. A little swap of the light feed and the power feed.. my switches now turn on and off the right way I guess if I looked at the switch closely, I coulda figured out which screw was for the light and which was for the power. So I figured either they were all correct or all wrong. I asked my electrician about those when he called and had them changed over before he came over to finish the panel.

Also, I really didn't go into this project completely blind. I have a book that I bought that has everything about finishing a basement. Covers everything.. concrete/foundation repair, framing, hvac, plumbing, electrical, insulating, drywall, trim, finishing, etc etc. We bought that about 2 weeks after we purchased our house. Its been a valuable aid for me. And my electrician, got me lined up on any question I had and I did 99% of the work. So I didn't mean to sound like an ass, I respect all the help/guidance you've given me.

I'll have to snap a few pics for you guys. I was actually impressed with myself.. was an accomplishment on the grandest scale for me, lol.

-------------------------------


Now, I don't know if I should start another thread since my question is related to my work, lol..

I have another dimmer running 10 cans. Its a 1000w rated dimmer. Originally I had 60w bulbs. It seemed a little too dim form me so I went out and bought 75w bulbs. Im still under the max of the switch (750w total) and I noticed the switch is pretty hot. Ive done my research and understand thats how they work, they get hot by design, but how hot is safe? After I submit this post, Im going to shut off the power and recheck my connections for loose-ness. Also, I'm going to swap back in the 60w bulbs and see if that gets as hot.

Its not a cheapy dimmer, it's probably 'middle of the line' and its the one that looks like a normal switch. (not the round dial, nor the slider).

I'm sure the 60w bulbs will help, but I like the light the 75's give off. But I'd rather be safe than sorry.
 
  #12  
Old 04-26-07, 12:04 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
for the ressced cans you may have to check the wattage it will be labeled inside of the can and the type of trim it will make the diffrence and majorty of the cans do have thermal switch in there if get too hot it will shut off the light until it cool off then come back on.


for dimmers it normal to get very warm during dimming opeteration but not too hot like super heated hot water if you get the idea.

sometime a trick to get the dimmer to cool off faster is get metal switch plate cover it will act like heat sink to displace the heat


otherwise seems you got the poject pretty well handled there

Merci , Marc
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes