Planer Wiring

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  #1  
Old 04-23-07, 11:33 AM
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Planer Wiring

I recently received a planer with a 5 h.p. motor.

From previous postings, I know that info from the motor data plate is required to determine what size breaker and wiring would be require to get the planer up and running.

Can somebody please list what is needed off of the data plate?

The planer will not be hard wired, but plugs into a twist type outlet (I'll pass that info along once I get home and can find the plug type).



Thanks.
 
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Old 04-23-07, 12:27 PM
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Motor horsepower, voltage, full load current (amps) and service factor to start with.
 
  #3  
Old 04-23-07, 07:34 PM
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Single-phase or 3-phase?
 
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Old 04-28-07, 04:54 AM
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Here's the details

Sorry for the delay. Let me know if I left anything out.

Baldor 3 H.P. motor (not 5 as originally posted)
Single phase
volts 115-208/230
AMPS 28/14
RPM 3450

FURD, Only thing on the spec. plate that was close to Service Factor was something that said SER and then F1181. Don't know if that was a serial number or short for Service factor.

My plan is to come out of the panel box in th garage and surface mount a recepticle. The recepticle is a Leviton twist lock NEMA LG-30. I will only be going about 3 feet from the panel box.

I have some left over 6 gauge copper in black. red, white and green from a hot tub wiring. It is THWN/THHN. The receptacle is marked "G", "X" and "Y". The #6 fits into the holes in the back (also holes for smaller wire if I wanted to wire the motro for 115, but I want to stay with the 220).

What size breaker should I use? and does it matter if the where the red and black wire go on the receptacle? In other words, does red go in the X or Y location or does it matter? I know the green ground goes in the G hole.

Thanks for any assistance.

P.S. The motor has about a 6' cord on it to allow the planer to be rolled around. The cord is a heavy duty, 10/3 stranded wire.
 
  #5  
Old 04-28-07, 05:35 AM
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208 is three phase. Is this motor convertible? Some can run on single or three phase.
 
  #6  
Old 04-28-07, 06:24 AM
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It says Single Phase

The data plate says single phase.

I just put in the info just as it was stamped into the data plate on the motor. No idea if it is convertible.
 
  #7  
Old 04-28-07, 07:38 AM
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Smile

If the compressor came from the factory equipped with a 30 amp plug, you will have to protect it with a (maximum) 30 amp breaker.

I wouldn't use less because it probably wouldn't start the motor.

The #6 wire is OK....actually you could use #10 copper.

Hope this helps.

steve
 
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Old 04-28-07, 10:59 AM
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Since this machine came from the factory with a plug-connected cordset hillbilly ace is correct that the maximum size circuit breaker cannot exceed the rating of the plug, in this case 30 amperes.

Also, since it comes from the factory with a cordset I assume (always dangerous) that it already has the proper motor starter and overload device.




Burkej62: I have seen a lot of motors in my life and I have never seen one that is "convertable" between three-phase and single-phase. Under some conditions it is possible to run a three-phase motor on single phase power but it involves at the least a means of starting the motor, usually with a capacitor, and then usually an additional running capacitor.
 
  #9  
Old 04-28-07, 11:07 AM
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208V doesn't always have to be a 3-phase machine. You could easily be in a small shop with 3-phase wye service, giving you 120V and 208V. Plenty of machines are available that can be powered by 208V single-phase for just such applications when you don't want a 3-phase machine (for later portability or whatever.)
 
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Old 04-28-07, 11:13 AM
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When a motor is marked 208/230 it means that it can run on either.

Some, if not most motors cannot.
 
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Old 04-28-07, 12:42 PM
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is the motor listed as "thermally protected"?

if so, is it auto reset or manual reset.

If it is not thermally protected, you must use a motor starter that includes thermal protection.

if the thermal protection within the motor is auto reset, you need to use a motor starter with thermal protection.
===============

as others have stated 208 volts is available single phase but it is a voltage only available from a 3 phase wye service (at least without other transformers involved).

it available using 2 legs of such a service as single phase or it is available using all 3 legs of the service as 3 phase.
============
 
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Old 04-29-07, 07:39 AM
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This is all true and needs to be considered....if.....the planer didn't come pre-wired from the factory with a factory attached power cord.
If it did, the manufacturer would have (should have) supplied the motor overload (either internal or external to the motor) already installed.

If by chance, someone wired this motor themselves (as in home made), it's possible that the motor overload wasn't installed as required.

Is it a factory assembly?

If not, post back with more details.

steve
 
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Old 04-29-07, 12:09 PM
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Even if the overload is internal (notice I did ask) since this is a planer and an auto reset would cause a hazaedous condition, code requires an external non-auto reset overload to be installed.

It's for the safety function that if the motor thermal tripped out and they were auto reset, it would be possible the user would have their hand in an indafe place when the thermals.
 
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Old 05-01-07, 05:10 AM
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Thanks for the replies

Thanks for the replies.

Even though the posts got into a debate that was off topic, at least I found out the maximum breaker size and wire size.

Nobody ever told me if there is a standard wire color for the recepticle holes marked "X" and "Y". Anybody have an answer for this?
 
  #15  
Old 05-01-07, 08:17 AM
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> standard wire color for the recepticle holes marked "X" and "Y"

The hot wires may be any color other than white, gray or green; it doesn't matter if the red or black is on the X or Y. Both hots can be red or black if you choose.
 
  #16  
Old 05-01-07, 08:18 AM
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Red and black .
 
  #17  
Old 05-01-07, 09:10 AM
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Thanks Again

Thanks for the reply on the colors.

Now to find time to do some electrical work instaed of yard work!!!
 
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