220v vs 110v

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  #1  
Old 05-17-07, 09:03 AM
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220v vs 110v

Hello all. I am sure this topic has been beaten to death, but here goes.

I am currently running a 1 hp pool pump off of a dedicated 20a 110v circuit. There are no problems at all with this configuration.

My question is this. Is there any benefit AT ALL if I installed a 220v circuit and ran the pump?

The reason I ask this is because I want to run another circuit to the area 15a or 20a for other uses. Since I need to do this, would I benefit with just a single 20a 220v one instead.


Thanks in advance for any input.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-17-07, 09:12 AM
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First, is the pump designed to run from either 120 or 240 volts?

Second, if you leave it at 120V and need another 120V circuit there as well, you can have them be on a multiwire circuit and share a neutral. This is more efficient when both circuits are being used and uses less overall wire, but it has to be wired properly at the panel. This is also assuming these are wires in conduit and you can pull another in.

But if you convert the pump to 240V, then you're stuck with running an entire whole circuit anyway for the additional 120V circuit, because you won't have a neutral to share.
 
  #3  
Old 05-17-07, 09:33 AM
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I think you are asking if it is okay to change this to a multi-wire circuit and run each 120 volt load on half the circuit.

The answer is that there are benefits. You need only add one wire to the portion of the circuit that is individual wires. The voltage drop will be less.

But there disadvantages. You will need a 240 volt GFCI circuit breaker instead of the 120 volt GFCI breaker you probably are now using.
 
  #4  
Old 05-17-07, 10:01 AM
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Thanks for the quick answers!
The pump is designed to run both 240 and 110. The wiring was done many years ago long before I bought the house. It is wired to the main panel which is about 100 ft away. I have since added a 50a sub panel panel in the garage which is about 40ft away from the pool pump. Like I stated, there is no problems at all with the current circuit. I want to add another circuit for other things in the shed.
I guess what I am asking is that does the pump run more efficiently and is there any difference in energy cost/consumption. So, since i have the current 20a coming from the main panel, and I would be running the new wire from the closer sub- panel, does a multi wire configuration still work?
Or I can just run a new 220v to the pool pump!
 
  #5  
Old 05-17-07, 10:09 AM
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No. a multi-wire circuit does not work if you change the pump to be 240. The pump would need a dedicated 240 volt circuit and the other loads a 120 volt circuit.
 
  #6  
Old 05-17-07, 10:15 AM
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Understood....but as for pump efficiency/cost/consumption is using the 220v?
 
  #7  
Old 05-17-07, 10:22 AM
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It's possible you might get a longer life span out of the pump on 220. Heat tends to be a factor of how many amps are being drawn and by doubling the voltage, you'll halve the amperage. Heat generation can be a factor in diminished life span of electrical devices.
 
  #8  
Old 05-17-07, 10:28 AM
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Ahhh Good info.....now for the cost/consumption factor in running it on a 220v.

Is there any?
 
  #9  
Old 05-17-07, 10:32 AM
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Less heat generation does equate to increased efficiency, but I don't think it will be anything big enough to notice.
 
  #10  
Old 05-17-07, 10:38 AM
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Great info...I suppose I will leave the current 20a 110v circuit to run the pump and just add another 20a 110v circuit to the shed from the sub panel due to the shorter distance.
I should have added what the increased load is for. The pump is a 1hp and the start up current I believe is around 13 or so AMPS. I want to add a Salt Chlorination system which uses 110v and has a very low draw.
This system must run while the pump is running and I will be installing a timer to handle both systems.

My overall concern was having both run at the same time with the pump Start UP daw the main issue.
 
  #11  
Old 05-20-07, 07:40 AM
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I'd run a new 240V only circuit just for the pump. You might want to install a neutral for the timer though, if it needs it.
More enrey will go to spinning the shaft, rather than lost in heating the wires.
 
  #12  
Old 05-20-07, 10:04 AM
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Since you are installing the new circuit from a different panel, you can't multiwire it (share the neutral) with the existing circuit anyway, so you certainly can make the existing circuit the 120V and add the second as a 240V for the pump. Good idea. Just remember that the disconnects for these two circuits to the same location will be in different panels. It would be good to label them well.
 
  #13  
Old 05-20-07, 06:51 PM
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Thanks again all for the help. I am already in the process of running a new 220v 20a line to the pool shed from the sub panel for the pump. With the existing 120v 20a circuit already there form the main panel.....I will have ample service
 
  #14  
Old 05-21-07, 05:00 AM
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Not sure if the responses, answered the question. The pump requires a certain amount of power(watts), it does not care if it is 120/20A or 240/10A. The benefit of 240 is you can run smaller wire, #14 vs #12. Above 20A you don't have a choice. Rather than run multiple circuits to the pump house, I would run one 240V circuit and split things in a sub panel.
 
  #15  
Old 05-21-07, 03:06 PM
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Thanks, JustBill...I think I pretty well got my original post answered by all of you..I am just about finished running the wire to the shed...I am going to install a GFCI receptacle rather than a GFCI breaker as the timer while surely trip it.

..This was the whole purpose of running a 220v circuit. I need to handle the 1hp pump start-up current as well as the chlorine generator which must run simultaneously.
 
  #16  
Old 05-23-07, 03:05 PM
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Hello again all!
The wire run is completed from the sub panel to the pool shed.
My next issue is that since it is for a pool pump and chlorine generator, and will be 20a/220v, i need to protect it with a GFCI. The pump is currently running off of a 110v 20a circuit using a 3 wire cord. I did use 12/3 wire for the 220v circuit as I did not have to purchase the wire, so I used it. I will also be installing a timer to run both devices. . rather than install a GFCI breaker, I am opting for a GFCI receptacle to protect the circuit.
My question is, that since this is a three wire pump, do I use black/white as hot and omit the red? or black/red as hot?
 
  #17  
Old 05-23-07, 04:39 PM
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You have to use a 2-pole GFCI breaker to protect the 240V circuit.

Since you have the red wire, use it and not the white. You would have needed to recolor the white where it was visible anyway.
 
  #18  
Old 05-23-07, 04:42 PM
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I forgot to mention...I have heard that if you hard wire the pump to a timer, that is doesn't need to be GFCI protected? Any truth to this?
 
  #19  
Old 05-23-07, 05:01 PM
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Where did you hear this?
 
  #20  
Old 05-23-07, 05:09 PM
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A friend mentioned it to me, something about the NEC code..It's a site or forum....im gonna look it up.
 
  #21  
Old 05-23-07, 06:02 PM
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Perhaps your friend knows something that none of us here have ever heard of.
 
  #22  
Old 05-23-07, 06:20 PM
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i found the site...and yes there are codes which do not require a GFCI if the pump is hardwired. I just assume install a GFCI receptacle...but here's the link anyway


http://www.mikeholt.com/index.php?id=homegeneral
 
  #23  
Old 05-23-07, 06:30 PM
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Anyway, getting back to my wiring issue...i have 12/3 wire now out to the pump off of a 20a 220v circuit....I need to install a dual circuit timer to simultaneously run the pump and chlorine generator. The reason I want to install a GFCI receptacle rather than a GFCI breaker because of a previous experience..A while back I installed 110v line voltage landscape lighting and installed a GFCI circuit breaker with timer. Every time the timer was turned on, it tripped the breaker. I tried both a mechanical timer and a digital timer. So I installed a GFCI receptacle to protect the circuit. I am not sure if the same problem will occur with a pool pump and chlorine generator wired to a timer.
 
  #24  
Old 05-23-07, 07:06 PM
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I don't know of any 240-volt GFCI receptacles.
 
  #25  
Old 05-23-07, 07:17 PM
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the GFCI breaker is the most logical way to go,,but as I said, I'm concerned it will be tripped when the load is turned on
 
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