Attic lighting on angled rafters

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  #1  
Old 05-23-07, 12:21 PM
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Attic lighting on angled rafters

I want to install several 40w bulbs (or maybe use the flouresant ones?) to light up our attic (no storage, just access to ductwork).

Our house is a prefab, so the only thing in the attic is the angled rafters and the main center beam along the length of our house where the prefab sections are joined.

So I think I want to add six boxes, but I need to mount them to the angled rafters.

1. Should I use a regular round plastic nailed box and try to nail it level or nail it skewed with the rafters? If so I'm wondering if I try to nail it level if the plastic fixture for the bulb (no pullchain) can even mount due to the angled rafter. Are you even allowed to mount a box for lighting on an angle??

2. Maybe I should use one of the round plastic boxes with the extension arms and mount the box between the rafters? Like the light-duty version of the ones we use to support ceiling fans between joists, but meant for just lighting. The I could have the bulbs point down.


I'm trying to lightup the attic at night due to a visiting bat I want to deter.


Paul
 
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  #2  
Old 05-23-07, 12:26 PM
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You may use any plastic or metal; square, round or octagon boxes. You can mount it level or with the angle of the roof. The only thing you can't do is modify the boxes by cutting, drilling, etc.
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-07, 12:35 PM
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Too bad they don't make a box that you can nail up skewed but then rotate the box downward.
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-07, 12:48 PM
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It doesn't matter which way the box points. Most bulbs cast their light in all directions, and most bulbs don't care which way they are pointed. Having the bulb point directly away from the rafter is probably best anyway, to keep the bulb as far as possible from the wood.
 
  #5  
Old 05-23-07, 12:52 PM
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Yeah, that was the reason I was thinking about using the boxes with the telescoping arms. At least then they're between the rafters.

Ok, so I'll have to see if I angle it on the rafter or just go between them

One other thought.. Rather than a 40w incadescant, I suppose I could use a "100w" flouresant bulb which is about the same as a 40w bulb, no?


Paul
 
  #6  
Old 05-23-07, 01:39 PM
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> I suppose I could use a "100w" flouresant bulb which is about the
> same as a 40w bulb, no?

Other way around. The 13W compact fluorescent (CF) lamps put out the same light as a 60W standard incandescent bulb. There are also ~25W CF lamps which are equivalent to 100W incandescent bulbs. Plus, the CF lamps operate much cooler and last for years.
 
  #7  
Old 05-24-07, 09:11 AM
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I installed two light 48" florecent fixtures in my attic. They are the plug in type so I wired several outlets that are switched. When working in the attic it was nice to have access to an outlet for my power tools as well.

The advantage is that the florecent bulbs give off a much more even light with less shadows than an incandecent and they do not get hot. On the down side in the winter they can take a minute to warm up to full brightness.

I use my attic for storage so the extra light really helps when trying to see what is in what box.
 
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