Ceiling Fan problem

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  #1  
Old 05-26-07, 07:45 AM
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Ceiling Fan problem

Hello all,

I just installed a brand new Harbor Breeze ceiling fan in the master bedroom. I just bought the house and the current fan did not work. Come to find out, the fan operated on remote and the remote was missing. Anyway, I installed the new fan and before it was completely finished I made sure it worked. Well, it didn't, So I installed a light bulb and the light worked, so I knew I had power to the fan. Several minutes later, the fan decided to work. It was like there was a long delay in the power traveling through the wires, LOL

Well, fast forward to the end..... Once finished the fan on High speed is basically like low speed. I don't have a voltage meter but I'm wondering if I don't have full voltage to Fan?? any ideas or advice??
I should add, that the fan is operated by a remote. and that there was a red wire in the ceiling not connected to the previous fan.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-26-07, 07:57 AM
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Tell us how you wired the fan, what type of switch is involved, and what the wiring is at the switch. Tell us ALL the wiring.

Also, is this a fan and a light, or just a fan. Finally, if there is no light and no switched receptacle in the room then you likely may be creating (or continuing) a code violation, which you should correct.
 
  #3  
Old 05-26-07, 08:14 AM
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Racraft,

I would disagree with your statement about the light AND a switched outlet. Yes, one OR the other is required in a habitable room. However the Code making panel does not even require that the luminaire be installed. Building Code may supercede.

2-251 Log #575 NEC-P02 Final Action: Reject
(210.70)
__________________________________________________ __________
Submitter: Alan H. Nadon, City of Elkhart, IN
Recommendation: Revise as follows:
210.70 Lighting Outlets Required. Lighting outlets, that provide illumination,
shall be installed where specified in 210.70(A), (B), (C).
Substantiation: As currently worded, only 210.70(A)(2)(b) requires a lighting
outlet to actually illuminate anything. The definition of a lighting outlet, in
Article 100 does not require anything more than a junction box with switched
conductors intended to be connected to a lampholder, light fixture, or pendent
light. A proposal has also been submitted to change or amend the definition of
lighting outlet. Proper illumination ensures safe movement for persons thus
preventing many accidents.
Panel Meeting Action: Reject
Panel Statement: The objective of the NEC is to provide the requirement for the lighting outlet. The requirements specific to illumination are in the building code.
Number Eligible to Vote: 12
Ballot Results: Affirmative: 12
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-07, 08:20 AM
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Ok, The wires coming out of the ceiling were white, black and a bare ground. The was a red wire capped off. This is what I found after removing the old fan. there is a switch on the wall that consisting of two switches. This switch puts power to the fan wiring.

I the fan is operated by a remote if the switch on the wall is ON. I connected the fan's remote receiver wires black to black in the ceiling, and white to white. Ground wire on the fan bracket was connected the house's bare ground wire.

I installed the fan's light kit wiring as follows: the fan's remote receiver had a blue, black and white wire coming off of it for the light kit. I connected the fan's light wiring blue to blue , black to black, white to white per the instructions.

The wall switch is a dual switch (2 switches) one has a red wire on the top of the switch, then a bare wire on the bottom. With the fan on, this switch does not seem to operate the fan or light on the fan. The other switch has a black wire at the top and a bare at the bottom. This switch will shut the fan off and the fan's light.

I just matched up the wires that were already there, no intention of violating any codes. I just bought the house
 
  #5  
Old 05-26-07, 08:28 AM
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PC Boss, I did not mean to imply that both are required. I only meant to imply that one or the other is required. I am well aware of the code.
 
  #6  
Old 05-26-07, 08:33 AM
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If you have a light in the fan then you are okay.

Use an analog volt meter and measure the voltage at the wires. You should have 120 volts at the wires feeding the light and the fan.

Unfortunately you did not answer my question about the wiring in complete detail. I need to know ALL the wiring. Tell me all the cables, all the wires in those cables, and how all those wires are connected to anything. it is NOT enough to simply tell me what color wires are attached where. I need to know what cable those wires come from.
 
  #7  
Old 05-26-07, 08:46 AM
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I'll have to take the fan down to see those cables. I couldn't see the "cables" during install, I guess they are tucked up in the ceiling out of sight.

Is there any way to test the voltage at the switch? Would that tell me anything as far as there could be low voltage to the fan?
 
  #8  
Old 05-26-07, 09:24 AM
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I want you to test the voltage entering the fan and light. Testing at the switch won't tell you anything.

Another possibility is that the fan pull chain or switch is in the slow speed position.
 
  #9  
Old 05-26-07, 09:38 AM
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I pulled on the pull chain, and operated the fan that way. The speeds increased so, that may have been the problem. High still doesn't seem as fast as the other ones in the house. I still would like to check it with a voltage meter though.

Heres a question, The fan is a 60 inch. Could it be slower than the standard 52 or 46 inch fans due to the bigger fan blades? I'm sure they install the same size motor for all fan sizes, maybe the motor has to work a little harder to turn the blades??
 
  #10  
Old 05-26-07, 05:13 PM
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Yes a 60 inch fan will turn slower on the highest speed than will a fan with significantly smaller diameter blades. It has nothing to do with having to work harder (although it probably does take more horsepower) but it has everything to do with "tip speed", that is the speed that the tip of the fan blade is travelling through the air.

A little thought will make it clear that for the same rotational speed (rpm) the tip of the longer fan blade will be travelling a greater distance in the same time period than a smaller fan blade travels. This translates into a faster linear speed for the bigger fan.

Faster linear speeds create more noise and greater centrifugal forces. The larger fan needs to rotate slower to bring down the noise level and cetrifugal forces.
 
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