A quick 220V question.

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  #1  
Old 05-28-07, 12:34 PM
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A quick 220V question.

Hey I am new. And just have a quick question. here it is.

So I have a welder that needs 220.
The only 220v outlet in the house in for the dryer. the prongs on the cords look Different. and I bought a Dryer cord.

My question is Could I attach the prongs for the dryer cord I bought to the welder, and would it work fine?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-28-07, 01:05 PM
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So why didn't you tell us which welder it is? I'm going to assume it has a NEMA 6-50P plug on it, and can live with as little as 30A of input power.

Do you have a 3-wire or 4-wire dryer receptacle? It will be a NEMA 10-30R or 14-30R, respectively. Assuming you bought the correct plug/cord set, your best option is to make an adapter cord out of it, installing a NEMA 6-50R receptacle on the other end. This is available in an all-in-one plastic box and receptacle at both Lowe's and Home Depot, usually. You can also buy the box and receptacle separately, and assemble it yourself.

You could also replace the power cord on the welder with the dryer cord, but this will be shorter than the cord that came on it, usually.

You could also take back the cord you bought and make a longer adapting cord with the proper plug, receptacle, and any length of 12/3 or 10/3 SJOOW cord. Yes, you can use #12 if you want since this is a welder with what is likely a 30% duty cycle, even less at its maximums. But tell us which welder it is, so I can make sure.

Answer the specifics, and then we can help you make the cord, if you need it.
 
  #3  
Old 05-28-07, 03:07 PM
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Oh yeah, and it's usually easier than one thinks to just install a new, dedicated outlet for the welding machine. Do you have spaces available in your panel? If not, what brand and type of breakers are in there? Where is your panel in relation to the garage? Is it inside the wall, or hanging on the outside of it (flush or surface-mounted)?
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-07, 11:33 PM
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Thanks for such a quick response. I am not rushed for work so I can offer more details.

I think its NEMA 10-30R its a three prong. so I am assuming by what you said it is NEMA 10-30R.
I dont think making a dedicated outlet will work because it is my parents house and they would not like me doing this.


And the welder is also a three prong. so the only difference I can see is the alignment of the prongs...

heres a link to a diagram Not sure how to post images yet.
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c259/linkspast/welder.jpg

This is all I think I know.
 
  #5  
Old 05-28-07, 11:42 PM
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There is more than just a difference in pins. The dryer is a 120/240V ungrounded receptacle, and the welder is a 240V grounded plug. BUT, these adaptations are made all the time, and you will use the receptacle's neutral as an equipment ground; but never attempt to do the opposite.

The pins on the outside are the two hots and can be connected in any order. The pin in the middle is the ground or neutral.

Your parents should be the ones making all these decisions in their house. Have you tried talking to them first? If they won't let you install a proper receptacle for a welding machine, why would they want you making an adapter for the dryer receptacle and welding in their garage that way?

Is it something your dad or mom can do? If you bought the book "Wiring Simplified" from Home Depot (cheap compared to the price of a 240V welding machine) and showed them what you want done, can you do it together?

You still didn't tell me what welding machine you have.
 
  #6  
Old 05-29-07, 10:47 AM
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Its an arc welder. made by Clarke or something like that Some lady gave it to me. My parents dont care they just dont want me doing anything to the house.

All I think I really need to know is if the current will carry through the dryer cord.
 
  #7  
Old 05-29-07, 12:11 PM
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So you can't even read the model number off the machine? Well, if your parents are satisfied with you making your own power cords and welding right next to the laundry, go for it; the dryer cord will carry 30A.
 
  #8  
Old 05-29-07, 12:20 PM
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You really do need to read the name plate of the welder and figure out its electrical specifications. All welders are not created equal.
 
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