Dishwasher Wiring Help

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  #1  
Old 06-03-07, 03:01 PM
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Dishwasher Wiring Help

I have been searching around regarding the proper way to wire a dishwasher and am still a little confused. I read that you cannot use a plug / cord with your dishwasher unless the instructions specifically state that it can. My dishwasher instructions (Kenmore) do not specify the use of a plug (nor do they say you cannot use one).

So, here are my questions:

1) Am I forced to hardwire it?
2) How does the hardwire come out of the wall? I do not want it just dangling so would like to use a junction box - should this be surface mounted with greenfield coming out to dishwasher?
3) Do I also need a breaker-lock? (the panel is in a different room).


I want the install to look neat so I would prefer to use an appliance cord and an outlet behind the dishwasher rather than the sink.

I do not understand what all the fuss is about - all the other applicances (ie: 50 Amp stove) can use a cord with no problems.

Thanks..
 
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Old 06-03-07, 03:23 PM
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"I read that you cannot use a plug / cord with your dishwasher unless the instructions specifically state that it can."

Where did you read this? I'm not the expert on appliances but every DW I've seen has been plugged into an outlet under the sink, sharing the garbage disposal receptacle on a multiwire circuit. Do you have a garbage disposal receptacle at all?
 
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Old 06-03-07, 04:03 PM
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Here:


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UL Standard UL-749
UL 749
Household Dishwashers

7.3 Installation instructions

7.3.1A Where the installation instructions for a built-in dishwasher specifies that the appliance is able to be connected by means of a power-supply cord not already attached to the appliance by the manufacturer, the instructions shall specify that a power-supply cord kit marked for use with dishwashers shall be used. The cord kit shall comply with Clause 25.2A. The part or model number of the power-supply cord kit shall be included in the appliance installation instructions.

7.3.2 The installation instructions provided with a cord-connected undercounter appliance shall include the following instructions or equivalent information:

a) the power-supply receptacle for the appliance shall be installed in a cabinet or on a wall adjacent to the undercounter space in which the appliance is to be installed;
b) there shall be an opening through the partition between the compartments specified in (a) that is large enough for the attachment plug to pass through. The longest dimension of the opening shall not be more than 38 mm;
c) the edges of the opening specified in (b) shall, if the partition is wood, be smooth and rounded, or, if the partition is metal, be covered with an edge protector provided for this purpose by the manufacturer; and
d) care shall be exercised, when the appliance is installed or removed, to reduce the likelihood of damage to the power-supply cord.

25.2 Cord-connected appliances

25.2.1 The power-supply cord of an appliance provided with a means for grounding shall include an equipment-bonding conductor and shall terminate in a grounding-type attachment plug.

25.2.4 For a cord-connected built-in appliance:
a) the flexible cord shall be Type S, SJT, SPT-3, or the equivalent; and
b) the length of the flexible cord shall be 0.9 Ė 1.2 m, measured from the face of the attachment plug to the plane of the rear of the appliance.

25.2.5 The power-supply cord shall be attached permanently to the appliance or shall be in the form of a separate cord supplied as part of a power-supply cord kit with means for connection to the appliance. The power-supply cord kit shall comply with Clause 25.2A.

25.2.6 The ampacity of the cord and the current rating of the fittings shall not be less than the current rating of the appliance. For an appliance rated more than 15 A, the current rating of the attachment plug shall not be less than 125% of the current rating of the appliance. A 20 A plug shall be acceptable for an appliance rated not more than 4000 W at 240 V. The attachment plug shall be acceptable for use at a voltage equal to the rated voltage of the appliance.

25.2A Power-supply cord kits for use with undercounter or built-in dishwashers

25.2A.1 A power-supply cord kit intended for the installation of an undercounter or built-in dishwasher shall include the following:

a) power-supp ly cord, strain-relief means, and push-back relief that complies with Clause 25.2;
b) a part or model number marked on the power-supply cord kit package, or in the kit installation instructions;
c) installation instructions; and
d) grounding instructions in accordance with Clause 7.2.2.4(a).


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I do not have a garbage disposal.

Thanks..
 
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Old 06-03-07, 04:14 PM
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"the instructions shall specify that a power-supply cord kit MARKED FOR USE WITH DISHWASHERS shall be used."

I think the CAP part is the operative phrase. Unless another expert thinks differently, I would be putting a good appliance cord on it and putting a dedicated receptacle on the wall.
 
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Old 06-04-07, 08:55 AM
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That's what I'm thinking. I do not find it unsafe to use a cord just because the manuf. doesn't specify one.

I would be curious to see other's opinions on it.
 
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Old 06-04-07, 09:24 AM
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There's nothing wrong with hard-wiring it either. The cable simple comes out of the wall and runs to the junction box built into the dishwasher where the connections are made. It's dirt simple.
 
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Old 06-04-07, 11:13 AM
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Because I have the walls open, I am trying to minimize loose cables hanging around until I get the sheetrock up.

What do people normally do when the walls are not up and the cables are not run into junction boxes? I have the same issue with my undercabinet lighting and the best I can come up with is to leave the cables dangling until I get the sheetrock up. Then I would poke a hole in the sheetrock, feed the cable through, then mount the sheetrock.

Surely I am missing something here?
 
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Old 06-04-07, 02:04 PM
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Nope, you got it. Once the sheetrock is up and the dishwasher is in, you'll never see it again.

I would personally lean away from plugging in the DW behind the DW. If the plug ever becomes loose, you'll never know about it. As John said, unless there's a local code specifying something different, just hardwire it directly into the NM wire. No junction boxes and no plugs to fail over time.

Just don't turn the circuit on until it's all connected up. (put a piece of electrical tape over the circuit breaker to make sure noone accidentally turns it on either).
 
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Old 06-04-07, 02:09 PM
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Hmmm. I agree that I will never see the cable but I just hate knowing it's dangling out there (OCD).

Thanks for the replies.
 
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Old 06-04-07, 10:42 PM
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It will need to be long enough to reach the DW when it is pulled all the way out of the space (and then some) for cleaning and maintenance.
 
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Old 06-05-07, 07:15 AM
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I'll see what HD carries in my area. That is usually a good indication of what others do.
 
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Old 06-05-07, 05:30 PM
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The Kenmore machines Iíve seen usually come without a cord but offer a cord conversion kit (about $15 plus tax and shipping) that you can order through your local Sears parts store (or online if your parts list/manual gives you the number).

I recently ordered one for my dishwasher because Iíll be doing some kitchen work and donít want to keep disconnecting and reconnecting the hard wiring. The ďkitĒ is a couple of wire nuts, an NM connecter to attach the cord to the machineís j-box and the cord itself, which is worth the cost. Itís 105ļC rated and heavily insulated (both the individual wires and the cord itself); even though itís only 3 16 AWG stranded wires, the cord is at least 3/8Ē in diameter with all the insulation. It comes with tinned hot and neutral wires and a grounding ring attached to the ground wire. It also complies to the regulations for that machine to make it a legal add-on.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 09:07 AM
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Thanks DDR - I'm gonna check it out.
 
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