What is better, twisting wirenuts or not?

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  #1  
Old 06-06-07, 09:47 AM
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Smile What is better, twisting wirenuts or not?

What is better, twisting wirenuts or not?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-06-07, 09:54 AM
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I don't understand the question. Wire nuts must be twisted to go on. There are crimp on connectors, but those are different.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 09:59 AM
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Wirenuts

Some products say twisting is not required.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 09:59 AM
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They are probably talking about pre-twisting of the wires before you attempt to apply the wire nut.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 10:02 AM
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I believe they're talking about whether you twist the WIRES before you put on the wire nut. There are wire connectors that do not require twisting, but I don't think they're called wire nuts.

Whether or not to twist the wires before putting on a wire nuts is a religious debate I'd prefer not to have all over again. This topic comes up frequently, and sometimes we get threads 100 posts long on it. Everybody has their opinions and preferences, some quite strongly.

If the instructions that came with your wire nuts say whether or not to twist, then follow the instructions. If the instructions don't say, then do whatever you want.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 10:04 AM
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Wirenuts

Many manufacturers will state in their instructions that pre-twisting is not necessary.

So, here's my question : Would you follow the manufacturer's advice and splice say 3 # 14 AWG wires under one yellow wire nut, or would you pre-twist the wires and give your customer an added advantage and a better possibility that the connection will not come apart, or would you just go ahead and make the splice according to the suggestion that is UL listed?
 
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Old 06-06-07, 10:08 AM
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Again, religious debate. Half the posters here would say do it the first way, and half would say do it the second way. There's no universal right answer (despite the fact that many people think there is).
 
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Old 06-06-07, 01:08 PM
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FWIW, I pre twist all my connections. It's just easier for me to get a tight wire nut connection.
 
  #9  
Old 06-06-07, 01:16 PM
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Totally depends on the wires being connected at the time.
 
  #10  
Old 06-06-07, 03:35 PM
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The point about not pre-twisting is that the wires will get twisted IF the wire nut is properly installed. I rarely see this happen though.
I pre-twist.


IMO this topic smells of bait.
 
  #11  
Old 06-06-07, 05:28 PM
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Pre twist solid, let the wirenut twist stranded.
 
  #12  
Old 06-06-07, 05:30 PM
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one more vote for pretwist, that way you know you are starting with a good connection. The wirenut is just added insurance.
 
  #13  
Old 06-06-07, 10:26 PM
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I've seen so many failed connections by not pretwisting that I believe there is no other way. As an electrician I can sleep at night knowing that I have provided my customers with the best job possible. Pretwist and trim even.
 
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Old 06-07-07, 01:00 AM
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Wow, this thread isn't locked yet?
 
  #15  
Old 06-07-07, 06:31 AM
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IMHO as long as we keep this to a polite thread were we state our own preferences but don't try to convince anyone else that we are right and they are wrong, then this could be a useful set of data, and shouldn't be locked.

Since I am not a professional, and can afford to work slowly, my general method is to line the wires up carefully, tape them about 2" from the splice to hold them together, and then screw on a wire-nut until I get a couple of twists in the conductor bundle.

IMHO the biggest benefit of pretwisting is that you know that all of the wires are properly lined up when the go under the spring; if you don't do something then it is very easy for one wire to get pushed out as the spring screws on.

I find the tape approach especially useful with stranded wires, since these don't seem to take a permanent twist, and when you unscrew the wire-nut they spring apart.

-Jon

PS for John Nelson: Ideal sells an item called a 'set screw wire nut'. You put the wires in, screw down a small set screw in the side of a brass barrel, and then cover the whole thing with a plastic insulating cap. IMHO the _best_ wire-nut to use if you have only a short stub of wire to work with. Unfortunately quite expensive.
 
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Old 06-07-07, 06:40 AM
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All these replies and still no one has mentioned the push-in connectors like the Wagos or Ideal.

Just strip and insert, and with the Ideals you can see when the connection is all the way in. These are also handy for when the wire is too short.
 
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Old 06-07-07, 03:44 PM
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They sure make can lighting connections go fast, don't they? I have never had a failure on one, but wonder sometimes if they are going to go the way of stab backs on switches and receptacles? Just curious, not trying to get an argument started.
 
  #18  
Old 06-07-07, 11:38 PM
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I love Wagos, but didn't think them relevant yet, especially since they tend to start their own arguments, especially among the union hands here, of course. The bean counters like them. I always have them for tight boxes and short wires.

They are like wirenuts in one very important way. It's still the skill of the wireman that determines whether or not it's a sound connection, not the device, nor some hard and fast rule about what to do with the wires before you use it.

One thing I'll mention (before this thread is still sure to be locked) is that a good wirenut is more valuable than pretwisting and doing a special wirenut dance while using a cheap wire nut.

You can pretwist and use a GB wirenut on one connection, then NOT pretwist and use an Ideal wirenut on an equivalent connection. Take them both apart. You will see deeper threads scored by the Ideal wire nut (yet both will likely last forever).
 
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Old 06-08-07, 05:11 PM
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And have you seen the wire nut drivers that go into your drill? They actually sell these things.
 
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Old 06-08-07, 05:48 PM
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I use a impact gun to put on wire nuts....that's ok, isn't it?

John, this thread is expanding like you said it would. :-p
 
  #21  
Old 06-08-07, 09:13 PM
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The ones for the drill CAN be handy. I use them when I'm doing 8 hours of wirenutting #10's for 277V parking garage lighting and other big jobs.

Same as with manual operation, experience in the feel is the key.

Ideal's Twister brand (and knockoffs) work well with a nutdriver, too, when you're doing a lot of them.
 
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