Wiring for outdoor receptacle?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-11-07, 02:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 548
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wiring for outdoor receptacle?

I am in the process of finishing my basement and, while I have the walls open I thought I would run wire for an outdoor receptacle (for my Christmas lights, and possibly for some outdoor lighting later). My plan is to run 20 amp wire indoors from the circuit box. I'll run it through the studs, then I'll drill a hole through the exterior wall for the wire. I'll attach a box to the exterior wall, for the GFCI receptacle, then cover it with and in-use box.

My question is the following: Can I use indoor wire to this outdoor receptacle if it is attached to my house? Or, do I need outdoor wire (UF?) since the termination of the wire is outdoors?

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-11-07, 03:14 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,996
Received 39 Votes on 34 Posts
You would be fine with the indoor rated wire.

If you want to avoid the look of the bubble cover check out the in-box from Arlington fittings.

www.aifittings.com
 
  #3  
Old 06-11-07, 06:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,338
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
pcboss I like that AI cover ... I need it in a two-gang.

Also I have a TayMac, also single gang, which is intended for new installs in a fairly deep stud bay, but it's very nice if looks are important. Much better than the bubble.
 
  #4  
Old 10-04-07, 10:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 548
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am feeding the wire into the back of the box directly from my basement. Which type of connector should I use:

This:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/ima...&n=228013&s=hi


or a waterproof one, like this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/ima...&n=228013&s=hi

Also, if I have two wires coming into the box (I am running 3 boxes in series), what size hole/clamp should I use, 1/2" or 3/4"?

Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 10-04-07, 10:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
it depending on if this box is surfaced mounted or recessed mounted.

if recessed mounted the standard romax clamp will work if the wire is comming in the back of it [ box ]

for surfaced mounted box you have to used the weatherproof connector but if the wire is comming in from the back you still can used the standard romax connector as long you put the sealeant on the top of the box to prevent the water getting in back of the box.

but if you are adding few boxes along the wall of the home and all the box is recessed type can use either half or 3/4 inch romax connector if wired from the back but becarefull with this part i want to give you a fair head up if you are going to get the recessed box get the deep well type most shallow one may not work too well if you installed a GFCI repectale there [ belive me i did see that happend alot ]and you can run the rest of the outdoor repectale from this GFCI but make sure you marked which one is line and load this is very important part

if you dont do it right the GFCI will not work at all on the load side you can run the regular repectale after downstream from the GFCI but get the little label from the GFCI saying " GFCI protected " so you know this is protected by GFCI

if have more question please do post it here

Merci , Marc
 
  #6  
Old 10-05-07, 03:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 548
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
French,

Thanks. I was planning on surface mounting and sealing with silicone. Since I'm running the boxes in series, the first 2 boxes will need 2 feeds. Can I clamp both feeds to the same 3/8" connector?

By the way, just so I can understand this better, what is the proper way to wire the box if I were to use the watertight connectors through the single hole in the back of the box? The 1/2" connector seems to only take one wire (I'm using 12/2). The 2 wires also do not fit nicely in the 3/4" connector. Is there a special watertight connector to handle 2 wires? Or am I missing some concept here?
 
  #7  
Old 10-05-07, 03:22 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,996
Received 39 Votes on 34 Posts
Most dry location 1/2" NM connectors are listed for use with 2 NM cables. Weatherproof connectors will only be for use with 1 cable.
 
  #8  
Old 10-05-07, 06:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 548
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Weatherproof connectors will only be for use with 1 cable.
Thanks.

So, what does one do when there are 2 wires going to a surface mount box? Do you have the wires come in through the top and bottom holes of the box (or both from the top, if there are 2 holes up there), each with one weatherproof connector? If you use the 2 holes, does that mean you have to run the wires through a conduit into the box?
 
  #9  
Old 10-05-07, 08:10 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
You can't run cable unprotected. If you are not coming from the back you would need to use conduit.
So, what does one do when there are 2 wires going to a surface mount box? Do you have the wires come in through the top and bottom holes of the box...
 
  #10  
Old 11-04-07, 09:32 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
i would have to agree with ray 2047... as an electrician you can not run unprotected conductors through walls of any type especially outside where weather is a problem.... since you are talking about having two circuits outside ... you could run 12/3 romex to a box mounted on the inside of your house on top of the hole leading to the outside... then from the backside of the box mounted on the indes run pvc conduit through the wall to the back of another pcv box... then from the box run to the other boxes on the outside wall... as for wire... you can now you t90 stranded wire ... so from your inside box run two hots and a neutral outside to the outsaide box then run one hot the other boxes... the beauty of this system is that you now have the pvc conduit running outside .. which is totally weather proof and allows you to add aditional circuits should the need arise... also use GFCIs please... they save lives.. jsut thought i would give my two cents... it may cost a little more but in the long run you will be happier and soo will the inspector if you ever do anything major
 
  #11  
Old 11-04-07, 06:13 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 548
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by stephen4316 View Post
i would have to agree with ray 2047... as an electrician you can not run unprotected conductors through walls of any type especially outside where weather is a problem....
Stephen,

Thanks. If I'm reading your reply correctly, it sounds like you disagree with Ray. Ray writes that if you are not coming from the back you would need to use conduit. You write you can't run unprotected through walls.

I haven't gotten to this project yet, as other things have competed for my time. So, I just want to make sure I do the right thing.
 
  #12  
Old 11-05-07, 12:41 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Originally Posted by GaetanoL View Post
Stephen,

Thanks. If I'm reading your reply correctly, it sounds like you disagree with Ray. Ray writes that if you are not coming from the back you would need to use conduit. You write you can't run unprotected through walls.
What I meant was if the box was mounted on the surface the only way to get the wire to the top or bottom would be to drill a hole in the wall, run the cable through that hole, and then into the box opening. That would expose the cable for the inch or show between the two holes. Any unprotected exposure is not permissible. As others stated there is no problem with two cables in one hole so no problem coming from the back.

Note not all weather proof boxes have the same number of holes in the same place. It may though seem like that if you only look at the selection at one place. You might find one with two back holes. Can't say for sure. But we are full circle back to not needing two holes.
 
  #13  
Old 11-05-07, 09:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
hey there all ... we are all correct it just depends on how you wish to install the box and how you can access the various holes.. i find that for looks and practicallity acessing the the box from the back works the best .. you hide the mean of entry and you protect the means of entry by the connectors being recessed into the wall.. also if you try to get into on of the holes on the side with the hoel coming through the wall being beside, above or below the bow you will need to use what is called an LB because a pvc 90 will look very very bad.. this all cost extra money and is not needed.. as for how many wires you can put in the conduit you can defiantly put in 3 # 12 wires in a 1/2 PVC conduit... no debate there .. as for box choice you can get a extrior PVC box... this may or may not have a hole in the back but you can allways make one.. it take a 7/8 inch hole to hit the PVC connector... and again as for adding extra plugs along the wall you can just run them out of the PVC box.. if you want a better idea AKA picture just e-mail and i'll send you one [email protected]
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: