Voltage converter needed

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  #1  
Old 06-14-07, 07:08 AM
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Voltage converter needed

Yes, I Googled them, and see several. Since I've not bought one before, does anyone have experience buying one and/or have one they recommend?

It needs to be 2000-3000W and rated for continuous duty with a motor load (1400W blender).

220/240 to 110/120 V.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-14-07, 09:00 AM
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I've often wondered how those plug-in 220/110 wall converters work. Looking at a 1600W model on eBay, my technical thinking says if I have a 1600W load at 110V, fed by 220V, I need to drop an equal amount (1600W) within the converter. But there's no way a little wall wart is going to dissipate 1600 watts! So they have to be doing something squirrely with the power - chopping it with a triac, half-waving it with a rectifier, or something else. In other words, I don't think you can be guaranteed that every electrical device will work properly when operated off of one of these converters. Note that they only refer to simple devices as being able to being powered off the converters!

We have family overseas in China and they have learned to only use transformers to step the 220V down to 110V for their household use. It maintains the waveform integrity for all applications, but does have the drawbacks of size, weight, and initial cost. www.digikey.com lists several power transformers that can be used in 220/110 stepdown applications. They have a 1500 and 3000 VA model (approx. watts) on page 2020 of their online catalog. Pricing is rather steep at $287 and 326, though. You would have to put plugs and receptacles on these.
 
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Old 06-14-07, 09:06 AM
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240 to 120 is easy, as long as you don't need to convert the frequency to 50 Hz. The other way around is a bit trickier, and so is converting the frequency.

For anything permanent, it's better and cheaper to buy something designed for the proper voltage, even if it means scrapping what you already have.
 
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Old 06-14-07, 09:51 AM
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battery powered blender ?

http://www.smarthome.com/9171.html
 
  #5  
Old 06-14-07, 11:01 AM
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Continuous blender load? Just how many margaritas are you making?!? :-)
 
  #6  
Old 06-14-07, 11:12 AM
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240 volts to 120 volts is simply a transformer as long as you don't need to convert frequency as stated.
 
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Old 06-14-07, 12:28 PM
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The blender is a Vita-Mix. I've already researched trying to ship one (we are moving to Papua New Guinea) from Australia, but it'd be much cheaper to pack it and have a friend from NY put a voltage converter in his shipping crate and meet us there.

I've seen some of those small converters, but they do specify that the large loads have to be purely resistive, or something like that (that didn't make sense, either).

I'm looking at 40# or so for a good 2000-3000W unit, but was wondering if there was a chance that someone had actually used one and could tell me a good brand.

I might check out some supply houses here in town so I can see the product and then maybe ship it myself to NY.
 
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Old 06-14-07, 08:32 PM
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Those ones for resistive load use diode/triac tricks to make 240 V AC to some sort of pulsed 120V DC.

You will need a transformer. I'd get one where you are going, as it will be designed for the frequency and voltage input there, approved by their authorities for connection to mains supply, plus won't cost as much to ship.
 
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Old 06-14-07, 08:54 PM
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I've already been in touch with people there. They recommend bringing one if I don't have to worry about the shipping weight, which opportunity did present itself.

It's the 240V 50Hz Australian power system. It's not rocket science and they are plentifully available here. I've seen several online that I can ship to my friend in NY, just don't know who's a reputable supplier with goods that will last.

Yes, it must be a transformer for the full power, as I mentioned. The motor will run on the 50Hz.
 
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