Why no GFCI's?

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  #1  
Old 06-17-07, 06:29 PM
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Why no GFCI's?

My home was built sometime in the 1980's, maybe early 1990's. The outlets in the bathrooms appear to be regular wall outlets, not GFCI. Isn't this a requirement by law and should I swap them?

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 06-17-07, 06:42 PM
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They might be (and probably are) protected by either an upstream GFCI receptacle or a GFCI breaker.

Do you have other GFCIs in the house or GFCI breakers in the panel?
 
  #3  
Old 06-17-07, 10:36 PM
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My home was built in 1987 and I did not have GFCI receptacles in either bathroom or on my deck. All of these receptacles were fed from a GFCI receptacle located in my garage.

My kitchen had one GFCI receptacle and it was obviously installed after the house was built since my kitchen "small appliance circuits" were fed from GFCI circuit breakers.
 
  #4  
Old 06-18-07, 03:58 AM
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Not sure when GFI were required in bathrooms, but buy a tester(inexpensive at big box) and check the bathroom outlet. If it goes dead, you then have to find the GFI which is upstream. If not, install one. I once found the GFI for a 3rd floor bathroom in the basement utility room.
 
  #5  
Old 06-18-07, 05:03 AM
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Great info, thanks. Is it the sensitivity of GFCIs that make them so much safer, or the location on the actual outlet of the appliance in question? It seems that if electricity moves at the speed of light, an extra 20 to 50 feet wouldn't make any difference.
 
  #6  
Old 06-18-07, 05:14 AM
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Your question does not make sense. It makes no difference where a GFCI is installed. it will still provide the proper protection, assuming it works and is properly wired.

It is much easier to reset an accidental trip if the GFCI protection is via a GFCI in the bathroom, but it does not have to be.
 
  #7  
Old 06-19-07, 06:10 PM
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And electricity does NOT move at the speed of light anyway. The electrons themselves move more slowly, but the power applied is nearly instantaneous.

GFCIs work DIFFERENTLY from circuit breakers. They will protect against any fault current, whereas a breaker will allow you to be killed as long as it only takes 15 or 20 amps.
 
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