Electrical permit quizzes

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  #1  
Old 06-25-07, 02:12 PM
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Electrical permit quizzes

Could anyone let me know what to expect for a quiz on getting an electrical permit for a homeowner? I've moved to Indianapolis and previously lived in Michigan, so this process is new to me. I've done electrical work and been through permits and inspections.

My plans are pretty straight forward - put in a 20 amp 220 circuit for an air compressor in the garage, where the main panel is, with the wire run through conduit.
 
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Old 06-25-07, 05:02 PM
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It varies, some require a test, some only require that you are a live in homeowner. Whatever you do still has to pass inspection, but how you get there does not seem to matter.
 
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Old 06-26-07, 03:53 AM
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I guess what I meant to say is that I am required to take a test (only done on Fridays) and I'm looking for some idea on what to expect... Is it just going to be basic stuff like shutting off a circuit before working on it and calculating wattage given volts and current or something like I have to memorize tables of what wire gage is acceptable for different amperages?

Or another way to put the question is how do I prepare for the test, or is it going to be simple enough that I shouldn't have any problem with it?
 
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Old 06-26-07, 04:39 AM
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Any test that I have done has always had an outline available.

Perhaps clerks office where the test will be given will have that info.
What is on the test should really not be any kind of secret.
 
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Old 06-26-07, 06:34 AM
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Test

Do not expect the test to be confined to items relating to your particular project. Expect items concerning any phase of residential wiring.
 
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Old 06-26-07, 11:33 AM
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> to memorize tables of what wire gage is acceptable for different amperages?

I think you should at least expect #14 for 15A, #12 for 20A and #10 for 30A as those are the most common in residential wiring.
 
  #7  
Old 06-29-07, 12:16 PM
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Okay, I did my exam today so I thought I'd post about the experience in case anybody else finds this a useful guide to what to expect. It was a 10 question quiz and I was given an NEC code book to reference if needed, I don't think there was anything on there that couldn't be found in the code book, but then again.. it's a big book, so some familiarity is a good thing because you probably wouldn't be able to find answers in a standard work day if you went into the exam knowing nothing about anything.

To pass, you had to get 6 questions right... I got 6 questions right, the 6 questions I got right were the ones I knew and the 4 I didn't get right were guesses because I knew I wouldn't need to get the answers right to pass, they were on subjects I've vowed I'll never touch (I'm never going to work on the power company's side of my service box) and I just wasn't finding the answers quickly.

Here's what I remember:
Two of the questions I guessed wrong were 'what size conduit must be used for lines going into a 100A and 200A service?' and 'what is the minimum size conductor for 100A and 200A service?' (these were the only non-multiple choice questions)

Another question I got wrong, because I've never hooked up an electric water heater and I prefer gas anyway, 'what is the minimum size conductor for standard residential electric water heaters?' (I think I guessed 10 gauge)

If I recall correctly, the other question was about what you should do if you're doing some sort of major renovation involving service or something or other I'm never going to do myself, one of the choices had something to do with calling the power company, the one I picked had to do with assessing the capacity of the service connections.

Questions I got right included something about where GFCI is required, I don't remember too much else.
 
  #8  
Old 06-29-07, 01:42 PM
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Congrats on passing.

If you're curious:

> what size conduit must be used for lines going into a 100A

This is a bad question (unless they intended it to be a trick question) -- the conduit is sized to match the conductors and/or mast strength requirements, not the amps. Also, different material conduits have different wall thicknesses and therefore different fill limits. Some case 100A service could be done with 1"; sometimes 1-1/4".

> and 200A service?'

Usually 1-1/2" for copper conductors, 2" for aluminum.

> what is the minimum size conductor for 100A

#4 copper or #2 aluminum

> and 200A service?

#2/0 copper or #4/0 aluminum

> what is the minimum size conductor for standard residential electric
> water heaters?' (I think I guessed 10 gauge)

You guessed right.
 
  #9  
Old 06-29-07, 02:34 PM
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Had to take a similar quiz here in St. Louis to get permission to do my electrical renovations... It was almost funny.. two and a half hours to do 10 questions - with an open book format.... When I was done... and checked back in with the inspector... we talked about it and he was considering changing the quiz since there were obviously different correct answers to any number of the questions..... He was more interested in my ability to find my way around the codebook than he was having the correct answers...
 
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