Delta Unisaw Wiring

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  #1  
Old 06-26-07, 04:15 PM
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Delta Unisaw Wiring

Just bought my dream table saw. Delta X5 5hp Unisaw. Haven't used it yet because I don't have a 220 line in my garage. The instruction manual says to use as a minimum #10 wire with a 40amp time lag fuse. Does this sound right? I'll have to run a cable from my main breaker panel in the basement out to the garage which is about 100'. Is #10 still going to be ok considering the distance? Do I buy 10/2 or 10/3 wire. I'm a little familar with wiring basic 110 but never tackled 220. Any help would be greatly appreciatted. Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-26-07, 04:37 PM
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You should not run power to the garage for one tool. The best thing to do is run a line out for a subpanel, which can then service other tools and electrical needs. But I would love to have an old Unisaw, I have lost faith in Delta products for a new one. I have struggled along for about 18 yrs with a Contractors saw, and that is likely all I will ever have. Can't justify the cost of a Unisaw.
 
  #3  
Old 06-26-07, 04:48 PM
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There already is electric out there. I just need a 220 line. Actually probably 2 of them. I have a Grizzly jointer that's 220 and I"ll probably be getting a DC in the near future.
 
  #4  
Old 06-26-07, 05:12 PM
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You cannot run multiple circuits to an outbuilding except as a muti-wire circuit.

You need to run a new 240/120 feeder from your service panel in the house to a sub panel in the garage. The size is dependent on what your peak load in the garage will be and the distance from the service panel.

Just off the top of my head, with no calculations, I would run nothing less than #6 copper wire from a 60 ampere circuit breaker to no less than a 12/24 circuit sub panel.
 
  #5  
Old 06-26-07, 05:49 PM
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Is the garage attached or detached? If detached, the subpanel is required. If attached, it's probably still a good idea if you're already needed two additional 240V circuits.

How many people will be using large power tools out there at the same time, just you?
 
  #6  
Old 06-27-07, 10:29 AM
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The garage is attached. I'll be the only one using power tools at any one time. So the most it will be is a DC with a table saw or the DC with the jointer.
 
  #7  
Old 06-27-07, 10:49 AM
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Run one new circuit to the garage and install a sub panel. Then run the necessary appropriately sized 240 volt circuits from the sub panel.
 
  #8  
Old 06-27-07, 12:31 PM
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Most of the posts in this thread were assuming the garage was detached. Most garages that are 100 feet away probably are.

So let's go back to your first post and address your questions.

#10 wire will probably be just barely enough. To make a better analysis, we'd need the information from the name plate. I'd probably run #8 to have better control of the voltage drop and to make your saw start up more reliably. If you're an overengineering type, run #6.

So 10/2 or 8/2 or 6/2 is enough. You don't need 10/3 or 8/3 or 6/3. And there's no realy need for a subpanel in this application.

240-volt circuits are no more complicated than 120-volt circuits. Both kinds are just two wires and a ground. The only difference is that for 240-volt circuits, both wires attach to the breaker, whereas for 120-volt circuits, the white wire attaches to the neutral bus. That and the fact that you can more easily be harmed by 240 volts than by 120 volts.
 
  #9  
Old 07-24-07, 10:15 AM
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Sorry don't have a camera, but here are the specs to the saw,

36-L51X-BC50 - 5HP, 230V, 1PH Left Tilt UNISAW
 
  #10  
Old 07-25-07, 08:03 AM
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So what is your question? Install the circuit the manufacturer calls for. I might go to #8 wire due so the length, or I might not.

I would install a sub panel.
 
  #11  
Old 07-25-07, 08:50 AM
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What size wire would you guys use? #8 or #10. Thanks
 
  #12  
Old 07-25-07, 09:03 AM
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I would install a sub panel.
 
  #13  
Old 07-25-07, 09:30 AM
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What advantages are there with adding a subpanel? If I didn't add a subpanel what size wire would you use? Thanks.
 
  #14  
Old 07-25-07, 09:33 AM
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I would not install it except from a sub panel.

A sub panel will make your garage wiring easier in the future. If you place it near the saw it will count as the disconnect needed for the saw.
 
  #15  
Old 07-25-07, 09:40 AM
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I would use #8; #10 is cutting it too close over that distance. The saw may have trouble starting or trip the breaker if it bogs down.
 
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