110v sub panel from a 10-2 wire?

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  #1  
Old 06-27-07, 10:17 AM
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110v sub panel from a 10-2 wire?

Hello,

I recently had an above ground pool installed, and need to do the electric work so it can pass inspection. I finished my basement last year, which complicates things since I sheetrocked it. However, before I sheetrocked, I ran a spare 10-2 wire from the breaker box to my garage, in case I ever needed another circuit. The breaker box is on the opposite side of my house from the pool.

I have to have seperate curcuits for the motor and for a "convenience" outlet near the pool. However, I only have one 10-2 wire going into my garage. Is it possible (within code) to add a 30 amp 110 volt sub panel in my garage from the 10-2 wire. From that sub panel, I would put in a couple 15 amp breakers for the filter motor and for the spare outlet outside. edit: motor requires 20 amp breaker, so I would have a 15 and a 20 amp breaker in the 30 amp sub panel.

It seems like all the guides I see for sub panels use 220 volts to the sub panel, but like I said, I only have 10-2 wire (as opposed to say 10-3).

Thanks a bunch for any help!
 
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  #2  
Old 06-27-07, 10:25 AM
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You could install a 120 volt xub panel using the 10-2 wire, assuming it has a ground.

Is the garage detached?

However, you need a 20 amp circuit for the pump motor, and the circuit MUST meet many other requirements.

personally, I recommend that you make a hole in the sheet rock as needed, and run a proper circuit for a full 240 volt sub panel. You just spent all this money on a pool, you should at least run proper circuits for it.
 
  #3  
Old 06-27-07, 11:03 AM
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Thanks for the reply.

The garage is attatched. I already have 3 other (110v) circuits in it to accomdate my other electic needs in the garage. I agree that a 240v sub panel connected with 8-3 or 6-3 wire would be a better option, but I was just looking for an easier solution. The 10-2 wire that I did run into the garage "just in case" does have a ground. (has black, white, and bare copper, but no red)

The basement is finished as an apartment and my inlaws live down there - so the less I have to mess with the sheetrock down there the better. (basement is walk - out, so it has sliding glass doors to back yard and emergency egress windows)

I am learning about the other wiring requirements for the pool such as a bonded continuous ground wire, GFCI breaker, how deep I need to burry the wires, etc. However, I just wanted to make sure my idea to use the 10-2 wire for a subpanel would be up to code (assuming I wire it properly) before I worry about the rest.
 
  #4  
Old 06-27-07, 11:22 AM
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If you already have circuits running to the garage, use of these circuits for the convenience receptacle. Then use the 10-2 cable for the circuit for the pump.
 
  #5  
Old 06-27-07, 11:46 AM
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Good idea. I can either tap off a garage circuit (had not considered that) or my existing outside GFCI recepticle for the convenience plug near the pool.

However, I was looking into a sub panel in part to solve another code problem. I heard that the ground bond wire to the pool has to be un-cut from the breaker box. If I am tapping off of a 10-2 from my garage, then the ground wire is not continuous to a breaker box. I'll have to further investigate if this is in fact a requirement or not.
 
  #6  
Old 06-27-07, 11:54 AM
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This is not a requirement. You heard wrong.

Install a faceless GFCI in the garage. Wire the LOAD side of the faceless GFCI to the pump using THHW wires in conduit, which is what is required if they go outside the house.
 
  #7  
Old 06-27-07, 12:01 PM
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A couple things come to mind after reading this. If you use the 10/2 to feed a sub-panel for a pool pump circuit then the ground wire needs to be insulated not bare as it now becomes a pool panel feeder. If you use it as a branch circuit it can be bare while inside the house but must be a minimum #12 awg insulated green once it goes outside. If the pump is hard wired it does not need gfci.... if it is cord and plug it needs gfci. The plug must be a single twist lock type. You cannot use a duplex gfci to serve your pool pump if cord and plug. It must be either a dead front style or gfci breaker at the panel. also if cord and plug the receptacle cover must be the "IN USE" type. The receptacle cannot be closer than 5 feet from the pool.
Make sure you consider the length of run to the pump so voltage drop isn't a factor to the pumps longevity and efficiency. Remember to bond all the metal associated with the pool to the pool pump bonding lug using at least a #8 awg copper bonding wire and listed fasteners.
familiarize yourself with article 680 NEC and give this a read.........

http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homewiringusa/2002/accessory/poolabove/index.htm

Roger
 
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