Rules for 220?

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  #1  
Old 07-12-07, 12:28 PM
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Rules for 220?

I'm in the final stages of a full house rewire and am planning to run 220 to an outlet in my garage. Problem is I also want to put in a spa on the other side of the same wall the outlet is in. For some reason I remember seeing somewhere that you can only have one outlet on a 220 circuit but I'm not sure. I doubt I will ever use the garage outlet and only want it there since I'm doing the full rewire anyway. Can I put the spa and the garage on the same circuit? If so, what are the requirements? I believe I have to have a breaker box on the outside next to the spa. Is there a minimum requirement for the size of the breaker? I currently have a 50 amp double breaker on the subpanel to feed the spa/garage. Is that big enough or should it be 60 amps? Are there different clamping requirements for 220? What about junction boxes? Are there special ones? Are they even allowed?

I also would like to run 220 from my subpanel to a blank covered box in my laundry room for a possible electric dryer or for a spa outside (a much different part of the yards around my house than the one above - I like options). How would I properly terminate the wires in the box?

I have a roll of 8/2 Romex for the runs and all boxes on the outside of the house would be fed directly through the walls (no conduit). Is this reasonable?

I know it's a lot of questions but I don't really know where else to go to ask. Is there a ready reference or primer on 220 that could answer my questions?

TIA

Steve
 
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  #2  
Old 07-12-07, 12:46 PM
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Code requirements for hot tubs, spas and pools are very specific. You will not get it right unless you read up on thoroughly understand the rules. For example, you need a convenience receptacle nearby, you need a disconnect, etc. From the sounds of your post, you have much to learn BEFORE attempting to install a circuit for a spa or hot tub.

In general, 240 volt circuits are sized for the load. The dryer circuit you want, for example, should be a 30 amp 240/120 volt run. This means 10-3 with ground cable.

For a hot tub or spa the unit will call for a certain size circuit. your 8 gage cable is only enough for a 40 amp circuit, so you will probably need larger cable. You almost certainly will need a neutral wire, so that will mean x-3 with ground.

Research the spa or hot tub you want no. Run a circuit for it, but do not connect it.

In your case, I suggest that you run a circuit to the garage and terminate it in a junction box. I also suggest that you run a circuit for the spa or hot tub to the outside of the house.

Run a circuit for an electric dryer and go ahead and install a dryer receptacle. Also run a circuit for a spa or hot tub at that location and either terminate in a junction box or leave un-terminated at each end. Or run conduit and plan to install the circuit later on.
 
  #3  
Old 07-12-07, 02:23 PM
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> For some reason I remember seeing somewhere that you can only
> have one outlet on a 220 circuit but I'm not sure.

Generally 240V circuits are designed to supply a specific appliance or tool, however there are cases where multiple receptacles may be installed on a 240V circuit such as in a wood shop where saws may be moved around.

> Can I put the spa and the garage on the same circuit?

No; a spa requires a dedicated circuit in addition to many other requirements above and beyond that.

> I believe I have to have a breaker box on the outside next to the spa.

You need a disconnect near the spa. Sometimes this is a subpanel, sometimes a GFCI disconnect, sometimes just a large switch depending on other factors.

> Is there a minimum requirement for the size of the breaker?

Depends entirely on the spa manufacturer requirements. There are some spas with requirements as low as 240V @ 40A and as high as 120/240V @ 60A. A typical spa uses a 120/240V circuit at 50A, although some brands require separate 120/240V 20A and 240V 30A feeds.

> I currently have a 50 amp double breaker on the subpanel to feed the
> spa/garage.

This is probably enough for just the spa.

> Are there different clamping requirements for 220? What about junction
> boxes? Are there special ones? Are they even allowed?

All the same as 120V circuits.

> I like options). How would I properly terminate the wires in the box?

The cheapest way to provide yourself options is to simply install conduits w/o wires from the panel to locations where you think you may need them. This allows you to pull in appropriately sized wires when you decide what appliances will be installed. Wire is awfully expensive to install and not use.

> I have a roll of 8/2 Romex

This is the wrong cable for a subpanel, spa or dryer. It could be used for 240V power tool circuits or a welder perhaps.

> I know it's a lot of questions but I don't really know where else to go
> to ask. Is there a ready reference or primer on 220 that could answer
> my questions?

Generally speaking 240V circuits are installed the same as 120V circuits; the electrical code makes little distinction between any voltage circuit below 600V. The difference is that appliances which require 240V usually consume enough power that they require dedicated circuits in comparison to the low power lamps and televisions which may share 120V circuits.
 
  #4  
Old 07-12-07, 02:36 PM
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You may be able to use a GFCI spa panel that doubles as a disconnect and subpanel. This is available at Lowe's where I got my last one. It is rated 60A and includes the GFCI breaker for $100. It has provisions for another 2-pole breaker or even tandems of the ITE type, like Murray or Siemens. If you used a double-tandem as the second breaker, you could bring the convenience receptacle (if needed (you may already have one nearby)) and the 240V garage receptacle from this same subpanel.

What are your ideas for using this 240V garage receptacle?
 
  #5  
Old 07-12-07, 04:08 PM
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I'll ask what Mac asked. What do you want to do with this "220"? ??

I see this term many times in the original post but no mention of amperage. Folks throw the term "220" around quite casually not knowing it is a useless term without also including the amperage of the intended circuit.

For some reason folks think "220" is all that's important. Thing is "220v" is an outdated term. Nothing is "220" anymore. Basically residential circuits are either 120v, 240v, or 120/240v.

So what is the future intended use? Table saw? Welder? Compressor? A/C? Water heater? Kiln? Range?
All are different amperage circuits requiring different wiring and outlets. Some are 240v, some are 120/240v.
 
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