20 amp wiring question

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Old 07-19-07, 09:23 AM
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20 amp wiring question

This may be a stupid question, but I am re-wiring my kitchen and was wondering if I can replace all circuits, wiring and outlets to 20 amp instead of using any 15 amp? Can I also run the overhead lights on a 20 amp circuit as long as I use 12 gauge wire? Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:30 AM
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If you are in the US then the receptacles MUST be on 20 amp circuits, and you need at least two of them serving the counter top areas, which can only serve receptacles. However, those circuits can have 15 amp receptacles on them.

Yes, the lights in the kitchen can be on 20 amp circuits.

All 20 amp circuits for lighting and receptacles in residences must be at least 12 gage wire.

Be careful. Kitchens have very strict requirements, including GFCI protection. You might want to lay out your kitchen wiring plans here for us to comment on, or run them by a knowledgeable person (NOT a big box employee) so that you don't make a mistake.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
If you are in the US then the receptacles MUST be on 20 amp circuits, and you need at least two of them serving the counter top areas, which can only serve receptacles. However, those circuits can have 15 amp receptacles on them.

Yes, the lights in the kitchen can be on 20 amp circuits.

All 20 amp circuits for lighting and receptacles in residences must be at least 12 gage wire.

Be careful. Kitchens have very strict requirements, including GFCI protection. You might want to lay out your kitchen wiring plans here for us to comment on, or run them by a knowledgeable person (NOT a big box employee) so that you don't make a mistake.
Thanks for your quick response! Yes I am in the US. I wanted to use 5 separate 20amp circuits. 1 for the dishwasher, 1 for the disposal, 1 for the fridge, 1 for the microwave, and 1 for the other counter top areas (five more outlets)... all with 12 gage wire. Does this sound right
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:43 AM
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Unless it is a very large disposal dish washer and disposal can be on same circuit.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Unless it is a very large disposal dish washer and disposal can be on same circuit.
Cool thanks, so I really would only need 4 20a circuits?
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:56 AM
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You need at LEAST 2 20amp circuits for the countertops regardless of anything else, which also need to be GFCI.

Two 20 amp counter top circuit (which can serve nothing but countertop)

One dedicated fridge (20amp)

One dedicated microwave (20amp)
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by HotinOKC View Post
You need at LEAST 2 20amp circuits for the countertops regardless of anything else, which also need to be GFCI.

Two 20 amp counter top circuit (which can serve nothing but countertop)

One dedicated fridge (20amp)

One dedicated microwave (20amp)
Great, thanks for your help everyone!

Ron
 
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Old 07-19-07, 10:56 AM
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If the microwave is a counter top unit, and it's receptacle is on the counter top then that circuit counts as one of the two that is needed. However, I would still run another one. In my opinion, you want at l;east two circuits that are readily available for the coffee pot, the waffle maker, the blender, the toaster, etc.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
If the microwave is a counter top unit, and it's receptacle is on the counter top then that circuit counts as one of the two that is needed. However, I would still run another one. In my opinion, you want at l;east two circuits that are readily available for the coffee pot, the waffle maker, the blender, the toaster, etc.
Thanks, It will be a counter top microwave. So It would be a good idea to add two more separate circuits to the counter top, rather than just running the rest of the outlets (5) off of one?
 
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Old 07-19-07, 11:06 AM
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Yes, set yourself up with at least two counter top circuits, not counting the circuit for the microwave. Don;t forget that these circuits, including the one for the microwave need GFCI protection.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 11:47 AM
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also i will like to give you a head up with the Kitchen circuits as well.

what other been explaing it is clear shot there with the NEC code and also keep in your mind make sure you space the kitchen counter top repctales 4 {*}feet apart i am sure it stated in the NEC [ not sure excat spot but i can look up if you need to ]

otherwise you are set up as long other members expain it clear.

{*} note 4 feet is max spacing allowed { may have to check with the local code as well }


Merci , Marc
 
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Old 07-19-07, 12:16 PM
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Find a book that describes all the codes for a U.S. kitchen. Although most of the important facts have already been covered in this thread, there are other rules too. Wiring a kitchen without a good reference book would be unwise. The chances of you accidentally meeting all the codes without one are very slim.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
Find a book that describes all the codes for a U.S. kitchen. Although most of the important facts have already been covered in this thread, there are other rules too. Wiring a kitchen without a good reference book would be unwise. The chances of you accidentally meeting all the codes without one are very slim.
will do! thanks!
 
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