Wiring in a Sump Pump

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  #1  
Old 08-03-07, 07:46 AM
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Wiring in a Sump Pump

I have a chronically wet crawl space in a house on mine. I'm planning on adding a sumpr pump to drain it as needed.


My plan was to add a GFCI protected outlet and plug in the pump, but I could just as well hardwire the pump, and add a switch to control it, I suppose. Any recommendations?


Any particular things to look out for when buying the pump? There isn't a lot of water, really. The house just sits in clay and whatever water gets in tends to stay there like it's a bathtub.



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Old 08-03-07, 08:01 AM
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Do not use a GFCI receptacle. Use a simplex receptacle and just plug the pump in.
 
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Old 08-03-07, 08:04 AM
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Sump pumps come with a cord and plug attached. Just wire up a standard simplex non-GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 08-03-07, 09:34 AM
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Thanks for the replies.


I thought outlets in damp areas like crawl spaces had to be GFI protected. Is this an exception or am I mistaken on that?

As I understand it, unattended, automatic motors like a sump pump and GFI circuits don't go well together, since it might trip off without anyone being aware.


Thanks for your comments ---I'm trying to understand the reasoning behind these recommendations.




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Old 08-03-07, 10:05 AM
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Using a GFCI is the wrong way to go for just the reason you mention, that if ti trips you won;t know it. Further, as motors age they tend to leak current which could lead to a GFCI trip.

I suppose that there are some inspectors that would argue that this receptacle needs GFCI protection. We are suggesting a simplex receptacle (rather than a duplex) so that there is not a receptacle open that someone would plug something in to.

Certainly if you put other receptacles in the crawl space they should be GFCI, but this one can be non-GFCI.
 
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Old 08-03-07, 10:49 AM
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Ahhh, thanks racraft. I hadn't noticed your careful use of the simplex plug recommendation.



This will be right near the entrance to the crawl space, so I'm thinking of having the simplex plug you recommed, a GFI outlet and a switch to turn some lights on in the crawl space in a three gang box.


I'm supposing that would cover all my bases.



Thanks,



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  #7  
Old 08-03-07, 05:10 PM
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While the single non-GFCI protected recptacle would be permitted by 210.8(A)(5) Exception #2 if this was in a basement, there are no exceptions to 210.8(A)(4) for crawl spaces. The code requires GFCI protection for this outlet. Also under the 2008 code all of the GFCI exceptions in 210.8(A) will be removed.
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