Installing 2 GFCI's in one box


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Old 08-05-07, 07:08 AM
J
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Installing 2 GFCI's in one box

I was just wondering about the hook-ups of my situation. I'm coming off of a 20 amp circuit breaker with 12/2 romex. I know that I need to run to the line side of the GFCI on the first receptacle, white to neutral, black to hot, and copper to green screw. Now I know that I need to proceed from the load side to the next GFCI but does the hook-up go to the line or load side of the 2nd GFCI and do i need a grounding wire to the 2nd as well?
 
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Old 08-05-07, 07:38 AM
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You don't need a second GFCI. The first will protect the other receptacle(s). Use a standard receptacle connected to the load side of the first GFCI. All receptacles (and box if metal) need to be grounded.
 
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Old 08-05-07, 07:58 AM
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I know I don't really need it, but I want to put 2 side by side because I think it will look better than having two different receptacles. Isn't it okay to use 2 GFCI's side by side? Which way do I need to hook it up? Do I go into the load or line side of the 2nd GFCI?
 
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Old 08-05-07, 08:27 AM
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What about getting a square decorator receptacle? They cost less and look almost the same.

As for the right way to do what you're proposing, I'm not sure.
 
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Old 08-05-07, 08:32 AM
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You can certainly use two GFCI receptacles. However, as chandltp has stated, a decorator type receptacle will look almost the same, only it will not have the test and reset buttons.

If you use a second GFCI, make ALL connections on the line side of each GFCI. Do not use the LOAD terminals at all.

If you use one GFCI and one non-GFCI, then make the power connection to the line side of the GFCI, then run wires from the LOAD terminals of the GFCI to the receptacle.

In either case, the ground must be pigtailed to each receptacle and to the box, if the box is metal.
 
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Old 08-06-07, 07:16 AM
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Thanks for the help, guys! Really appreciate it!
 
 

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