Fuse, Can I use higher rated fuse

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-07-07, 11:17 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 10
Fuse, Can I use higher rated fuse

This is an apartment in a four-plex (four apartment building). It has old style fuses (round fuses that you screw in) in a fuse box in the living room.

I just bought a window air-conditioner that lists 110 vold 15 amp. I put it in a window where the outlet is on a circuit of 110 volts and the fuse for this circuit is a 15 amp fuse. (There are other things on the same circuit.)

But whenever I turn on the air-conditioner, it blows the fuse and the whole circuit is down.

Would it be OK if I put a 30 amp fuse (or higher) for this circuit?

Will the air conditioner work if I do that?

Will this cause any problems for this circuit, other circuit in this apartment, or other circuits in the building?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-07-07, 11:27 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 389
What you are proposing is totally unsafe. Don't do it!

The 15 amp fuse is there to protect the wiring in the walls that can only safely handle 15 amps of current. If you put in a larger fuse, you lose all protection.

Get a smaller window air conditioner that draws less current and turn off some other appliances on the same circuit.
 
  #3  
Old 08-07-07, 11:30 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 6
If the circuit is wired with #14 wire, which can safely carry 15 amps, you must not use a larger fuse. The extra current will overheat the wire, with a high probability of fire and shock hazard.
 
  #4  
Old 08-07-07, 11:32 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,332
> Would it be OK if I put a 30 amp fuse (or higher) for this circuit?

Do not increase the size of the fuse beyond 15A! Doing so would create a major electrical fire hazard.

The correct solution is for your landlord to hire an electrician to install a new, dedicated circuit for the air conditioner. In multi-unit rental property only a licensed electrician is legally allowed to perform electrical work. If your landlord is unwilling to pay for the upgrade, he may be willing to allow you to hire an electrician or deduct some percentage of the electrician cost from the rent or some other similar arrangement.

> Will this cause any problems for this circuit, other circuit in this
> apartment, or other circuits in the building?

Yes, there's a good chance it could burn down the building.
 
  #5  
Old 08-07-07, 11:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
The only possibility that might work is to use a time delay 15 amp fuse. This will work if the rest of the circuit is NOT used (or essentially not used).

The real solution, as indicated by others, is to have a dedicated circuit installed. You may be able to get this done if you offer to pay for it. You may be able to work out a split of the cost with the landlord if he or she likes you and wants to keep you. Of course if you just signed a lease and/or if the landlord doesn't particularly like you then he can refuse the request entirely, even if you offer to pay for it.

The time to bargain with the landlord was, of course, before you signed the lease.
 
  #6  
Old 08-07-07, 01:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 251
Originally Posted by racraft View Post
The only possibility that might work is to use a time delay 15 amp fuse. This will work if the rest of the circuit is NOT used (or essentially not used).

The real solution, as indicated by others, is to have a dedicated circuit installed. You may be able to get this done if you offer to pay for it. You may be able to work out a split of the cost with the landlord if he or she likes you and wants to keep you. Of course if you just signed a lease and/or if the landlord doesn't particularly like you then he can refuse the request entirely, even if you offer to pay for it.

The time to bargain with the landlord was, of course, before you signed the lease.
Old people talk about good and bad fuses, it depends of production variations.
"Good fuses" may be carrying a little more.
Your problem is the starting current it may be solved if you get some fuses made for motors. (allows big curent for short time, but breaks on small overcurrent during a peride of time compared to quick fuses)

dsk

I am not sure what it is called
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-07, 02:34 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
That is what Bob suggested, time delay fuses. It compensates for the influx of energy needed to start things like compressors, which can peak at near 12 amps at startup, then settle down to a normal running amperage.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'