Everyone's favorite topic ... Pool pump

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  #1  
Old 08-12-07, 01:52 PM
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Everyone's favorite topic ... Pool pump

I'm in the process of installing a 0.75 HP pool pump rated at 6.5A at 230 volts. The pump is about 40 feet from the main panel. I'm all good with bonding, grounding etc. ... everything seems to be in place like it should.

However, the current pump is wired from a junction box at the end of a single conduit. That conduit carries both the power for the pump and a separate circuit with a 120V GFCI outlet (which I have disconnected long ago because I didn't like the setup and there is an outlet on the other side of the pool that satisfies the outlet requirement).

- I can't seem to find this in the code ... but is it ok to run two circuits with differing voltage in the same conduit?
- If it is ok, even if the pump is hardwired, I would have to use a GFI circuit for the pump if they are in the same conduit ... correct?
- Even if I don't have to, would it be better to run the outlet through a separate conduit? If so, is there any real benefit to installing a GFI circuit for the pump? How do GFI breakers handle motor loads?
- Lastly, since the pump is only 6.5A ... it should only need 8.125A (at 125% as required for motor loads) ... am I really ok to run the pump on a dedicated 15A 240 circuit and 14 gauge wire? ... this is definitely not the area to save money, but no need to use overkill unless it's really needed.

Any input would be much appreciated ...

R
 
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Old 08-12-07, 02:03 PM
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You can have a 120 and a 240 volt circuit in the same conduit.

A hard wired pool pump needs no GFCI protection, although I wold provide it.

I would not use less than 12 gage wire for the pump. Think about the future.
 
  #3  
Old 08-12-07, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
I would not use less than 12 gage wire for the pump. Think about the future.
Excellent ... makes perfect sense ... it's easy to forget that the wires you lay might be used differently in the future.
 
  #4  
Old 08-13-07, 10:39 AM
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You actually must use a minimum #12 ground by code, so it would be silly to pull #14 hots with a #12 ground. I would use #12 conductors and a 15A DP breaker for the pump motor.

> is it ok to run two circuits with differing voltage in the same conduit?

As long as all the wires in the conduit are rated to the greatest voltage present in the conduit. All building wire is rated to at least 300V (600V now), so it's never a problem with 240V and 120V.

> I would have to use a GFI circuit for the pump

GFCI protection is optional for a hard-wired pool pump motor, so the other circuit(s) in the conduit don't matter.

> would it be better to run the outlet through a separate conduit?

No.

> If so, is there any real benefit to installing a GFI circuit for the pump?

The GFCI provides added safety. I'm not sure anyone can say it's X% safer, but the code making panel decided that the electrocution risk for hardwired pumps is sufficiently low to not require GFCI. Still a $100 GFCI breaker is pretty cheap in the scope of a major pool project.

> How do GFI breakers handle motor loads?

Just fine. Pool and spa pump motors are just about the only use for 2-pole GFCI breakers.
 
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