switches beginning/end of runs

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  #1  
Old 08-16-07, 04:29 PM
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switches beginning/end of runs

First time posting--I brought my incoming power to switch first. In between my beginning/end switches I have two lights but would like to operated each light seperately with each switch. If I pigtail the lights together and then switch loop each light to their switches, will I be able to operate each light separately with their own switch? I don't want 3-way switching due to wanting to operated each light separately.

Also, if I do a run of lights (5 sconces) with incoming power to going to load, can I separate the number of lights to be on by applying same principle? Example: I have three overhead lights and two wall sconces, all pigtailed and on same circuit, can I switch loop just the sconces and be able to turn them on seperately? Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 08-16-07, 05:04 PM
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You have two separate issues. That's tough to deal with in one thread. You might consider two separate threads.

Let me talk about your first puzzle and ignore your second for a moment. There are a lot of different ways to do this, but the one you suggested isn't one of them.

The simplest thing to do would be to route power to both switch boxes, and then from each switch box to the light it will control. If you do it that way, the connections are simple. You can just run a power cable to the first switch box, and then continue the power to the second switch box.

You can, however, wire it switch to light to light to switch if you want, but you'll need black/red/white cable from the first switch to the first light to do so. I don't really like this solution as it seems overly complicated, but it can be done. Just use the red as the switched hot and the black as the unswitched hot. Then use a switch loop from the second light to the second switch.

Tell us more about how you want to proceed and we can provide more detail.

Now let's talk about your second issue. There are also a lot of ways to do that. You could run unswitched power to all the fixtures, and then run a switch loop from each fixture to the switch that will control it. That works if you want the same number of switches as fixtures. If you want fewer switches than fixtures, then just run unswitched power to one fixture of each group. Run a switch loop from that fixture to the switch that will control it. Then run a cable from the first fixture of each group to the other fixtures that will be controlled by the same switch.

The problem with your questions are that they are too vague. There are 20 different ways to solve each problem, and we can't feasibly describe all 20 ways. You just have to pick one and go with it.

In general, I prefer to run unswitch power to each switch box, and then switched power from the switch box to the fixture or fixtures it controls. It's harder to screw things up this way.
 
  #3  
Old 08-16-07, 08:19 PM
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Thanks so much!

Thank you for your quick response. Since I have planned to wired my lights (the second part of my question) in a parallel type circuit, I have resigned myself to having to run another 14/2 cable so I can switch loop the lights in "groups". Great idea...Is is possible that from one of the light boxes can I "tap" it with a pigtail and run an additional incoming power source to a switch and from the switch to a ceiling fan (the ceiling fan will not have a light) and individually operate the fan from the "tapped" switch?
 
  #4  
Old 08-17-07, 08:19 AM
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If I understood your question correctly, then the answer is yes. As long as the cable carries an unswitched hot and a neutral, it doesn't matter which box it came from.
 
  #5  
Old 08-17-07, 06:47 PM
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Thanks again!

Thanks so much for your advice....it has helped so much...will let you know how it goes...best regards
 
  #6  
Old 08-17-07, 07:35 PM
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P.S. NEC 2007 codes for attic crawl space wiring

Recently installed attic addition. Behind each kneeling wall is a central air/heat unit. My attic has open cell foam insulation. Behind the A/C units with the thick R-8 insulated vent ducts and the roof rafters/top plate is AMPLE attic crawl space. Amt of space to run wire on top of joists before it meets the top plate and rafters is 2 1/2 feet wide. I will foam insulate my exterior walls as well once wiring is in place. Since that crawl space will be big enough to run wire yet too small to walk on, will the 2007 NEC codes allow me to run my wires in that space without having to use conduit? Wires will run in an organized fashion and identified for possible future need. Thanks so much.

P.S. Is there any NEC codes addition/changes in 2007 from 2005 codes that I need to pay particular attention to? Know about AFCI breakers for bedrooms, GFCI requirements, Amp requirements for each room in home, smoke alarm requirements for uniform alarm throughout house, dedicated circuits, etc.
 
  #7  
Old 08-18-07, 09:34 AM
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A possible option is routing 14/3 cable beteen the outlet-boxes . Two choices with the Black & Red condutors-- both are Switch-controlled conductors, or the Red is switch-controlled and the Black is a "Feed" routed thru switch-controlled outlet-boxes to a point from where the Black is extended to another single-pole switch outlet-box.
 
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