Hanging Light Wiring

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Old 09-12-07, 07:10 AM
C
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Hanging Light Wiring

I just bought a new hanging light fixture at Lowes.
The question I have is, the wire that comes from the two bulb sockets is ordinary lamp cord. Both wires being the same color. Does it make a difference which wire I hook up to the black house wire and the other going to the white neutral wire?? The instructions say hook black to black white to white, but the fixture wire is the same color.

I don't want to hook it up incorrectly.

Thanks.
cloverboy
 
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Old 09-12-07, 07:47 AM
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Yes, it does matter. Typically the neutral (white) wire in a lamp cord is the one that has a raised ridge, printed lettering, or raised lettering.

If both conductors of the cord are exactly the same, then you'll need a continuity (ohmmeter, multimeter) tester. The neutral wire will have continuity with the screw part of the bulb socket; the hot wire will have continuity with the center stud in the bulb socket.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 07:49 AM
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One side of the fixture cord commonly has a ribbed edge. This would be connected to the white wire from the ceiling fixture box.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 09:33 AM
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It is common for people to assert that both wires in the cord are the same. But that's only because they haven't looked closely enough.
 
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Old 09-12-07, 09:54 AM
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One more comment.

If you get them backwards, the lamp will still work. You will not be able to tell the difference, until it's too late.

Properly wired, the center of the base of the bulb sockets will be the hot wire and the side of the sockets will be the neutral or return. This is how it is intended to be wired and is the safest. This way, if you have the switch turned on while replacing a light bulb and your finger accidentally touch the bas of the bulb around the sides, you would contact the grounded neutral, minimizing the chance of a shock.

Improperly wired, the wires are reversed and the shell of the socket is the hot wire. You could accidentally shock yourself while changing a bulb, if the switch is turned on.
 
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Old 09-17-07, 06:43 AM
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Tried it....

Ok, so here is what I did. I called the company and they said the wire with the writing on it was the neutral wire.
You guys were right on with that one.

I used a multi meter set at 200 ohms. The neutral wire when tested to the screw part didn't register. When I tested neutral to the center tab, it jumped all over the place.
When I tested the supposed hot wire to the center tab, nothing. Tested to the screw part, it registered on the multimeter.

So, is it wired backwards on the fixture, or am I doing something wrong???

Thanks for all the great help!

cloverboy
 
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Old 09-17-07, 06:53 AM
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Sounds like it's wired backwards. Can you see where the wires are connected?
 
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