ground into house

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  #1  
Old 09-22-07, 11:03 AM
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ground into house

I need to put two ground rods into the ground and then attach them to a ground wire and then run it in the house.

www.joevb.us/images/b-house.jpg

if you look at that pic, I will be putting the grounding rods to the right of the meter, separated by > 6'. The breaker box is on the other side of the wall from the meter.

I am not sure what is the most common way to get the ground into my house through my wall.

Any ideas?

Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-22-07, 01:30 PM
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"X" ft of 3/4" PVC conduit strapped to the exterior wall and set next to the 2" PVC, dpending upon where the GC will pass thru the wall to the inside. You will need an "LB" condulet at the "above-ground" point where the grounding conductor will pass thru the wall and then connect to the Service panel.. Ths presumes the GC is #6 copper. #4 will require 1" PVC

No need to extend the PVC beyond the "LB" fitting. IF--IF-- the interior side of the partition is finished with sheetrock, and the cables extending from the panel are concealed behind the wall-finish, BE VERY CAREFUL where you drill the hole thru the wall at the point where the Grounding Conductor will pass thru the wall. Best to first cut a hole thu the sheetrock to verify that there are no cables exposed damage.

Good Luck, & Learn & Enjoy from the Experience!!!
 
  #3  
Old 09-22-07, 04:59 PM
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i have a lot more questions about this process now. I tried reading the NEC once but I think I threw up, not sure.

Is there some documentation that is in American?



Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 09-22-07, 05:31 PM
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First get your underground service lateral located "call before you dig". Have them mark it so you know where it is. You drive a ground rod through it and you may no get the job finished if you know what i mean.

Here is what you want...they show hose clamps.. no..no...no.. use the right clamps!


These materials below are what is acceptable (do not use aluminum). 99.9 % of the time you use solid bare copper wire. The wire you see to the water pipe is your water pipe bond you most likely already have that but check...to be sure. Don't touch it just look to see if you have it.


Graphics from Mike Holt Enterprises

This is the tree ways you are allowed to install rods. They have a priority... vertical first if you can't then 45 if you can't then in a trench.



See what I mean about knowing where the service underground lateral feeding you meter is?!!!
For connection to ground rods #6 solid bare copper the largest you need so just use it and no problems. You must use listed direct burial clamps called acorn clamps. You will get all the stuff at the electrical supply or big box.


Rent a hammer drill and ground rod chuck it will make your life easier to drive the rods.

In the enclosure that houses your main disconnect connect the #6 solid to the ground bar and kill power first at the main breaker and be freakin careful when you get that bare wire in the inside of that panel before you connect it to the neutral/grounding bar. the rods need to be no closer than 6 feet...just put them at around 8 to 10 feet don't drag out your tape measure and try to get them at 6 feet.

Roger
 
  #5  
Old 09-22-07, 06:01 PM
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Forgot to mention that what they are showing as no more than one termination or grounding electrode wire plus jumper to the other rod in one clamp is simply that. Run the grounding electrode conductor to the 1st rod from the ground bar at the main disconnect then attach to the rod under a clamp. Then add a clamp and run your jumper to the other clamp on the next rod. You can see this in some of the other images.

Or you can run a continuos grounding electrode conductor with no breaks from main disconnect to rod but becareful to not kink it at the first clamp so it doesnt loosen up. Also do not splice the gec or jumper anywhere. Must be continuous gec from panel to 1st rod and jumper is continuous to 2nd rod.

Roger
 
  #6  
Old 09-23-07, 08:02 AM
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ok, from the drawings there I can' put one of the grounding rods not too far from where the service enters the house, correct? if so, that would make things easy.

Second, there was no mention of how deep the ground wire needs to be below the surface of the dirt. Is there such a requirement for a ground wire?

Last, there was a mention of 'where in concrete or buried'? two questions here: does it need to be exposed for the inspection or just properly labeled? And, after the inspecting, if I do pour concrete over the area where the rods are, this is a possibility for the future, what labeling is required?

what I am going to do is start with one long piece of grounding wire, clamp that to the farthest grounding rod, then run that wire, unspliced, to the other grounding rod and clamp it there. I will then run the grounding wire, unspliced, into the main panel.

your help is certainly appreciated.
 
  #7  
Old 09-23-07, 01:37 PM
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these grounding rods need to be separated by 6 feet or more but can one be near a grounding rod for a loghtning rod?
 
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