Dead Outlet in Bathroom

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  #1  
Old 09-24-07, 01:21 PM
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Question Dead Outlet in Bathroom

Noticed that the Outlet in my Condo's bathroom was no longer working. Assumed it was the receptacle so attempted to replace with a GFGI outlet. When I removed the old outlet I was surprised to find 3 sets of wires, one of which was unused and uncapped. The other two were hooked to the receptacle but there was no power to any of them. Checked fuse box, all fuses on. Assume this is some type of continuous circuit setup, yet I don't notice any other outlets or lights not working.

Any thoughts on how to proceed. Condo is about 10 years old
 
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  #2  
Old 09-24-07, 01:24 PM
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This outlet is already GFCI protected, so there's no reason for you to add one here. The GFCI protection is elsewhere, probably in the garage or one of the other bathrooms in the house, or possibly in the basement. Look in those locations and push the reset button when you find the GFCI.

Don't come back and tell us that you don't have a GFCI in one of those places. Look harder. The one in the garage is often the hardest one to find. Countless people end up paying an electrician $50 to come out and push the button that they couldn't find. Don't be one of those people.
 
  #3  
Old 09-24-07, 01:57 PM
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As John stated, the problem is most likely a GFCI. 99 times out of one hundred (or probably even more often) that is the issue.

As for the extra set of capped wires, I suspect that in some upgrade someone separated out the circuits so that the bathrooms were separated to individual circuits or so that some other load was removed from the circuit. Capping the wires in this box and in the other box is one of the valid ways to accomplish this, so do not change the wiring.
 
  #4  
Old 09-24-07, 02:46 PM
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The receptacle is already GFCI protected. It has been required for much longer than 10 years. As already stated look around for the tripped GFCI.
 
  #5  
Old 09-25-07, 05:42 AM
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Smile Your Right!!!!! Thanks

Thanks John and everyone else who replied. Your service is exactly what I was hoping for. I knew it had to be something stupid and your response got right to the heart of the problem. Would have been pretty embarrassing to have hired an electrician to pop a button.

Turned out GFCI was in the garage. I had no idea that one receptacle provides GFI protection throughout the house and that the receptacle in question was located in the garage. Thanks again!!
 
  #6  
Old 09-25-07, 05:53 AM
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A GFCI receptacle does not automatically provide protection throughout the house. It all depends on the wiring.

Before bathroom receptacles were required to be on dedicated circuits serving either only bathroom receptacles or only serving one bathroom, they still needed GFCI protection (after a certain year). Often this was provided by a single GFCI located in the garage. Your setup is quite common.


My question to you is this. Why didn't you already know that the garage GFCI receptacle was on the same circuit? Shortly after you moved into your house you should have completely and thoroughly mapped out your electrical wiring. You should have determined exactly what is on each and every circuit in the house.

I suspect that you did not do this. Unfortunately you re not alone. Many people neglect to perform this vital, but time consuming, job. The information you obtain by doing this is vital when you have a problem. it would have saved you from asking us for help in this case. In another very common situation that you are likely to face sometime it could save you countless hours searching for a problem.

In still another situation this information could save your life. I will repeat that. The information cold save your life.

Take the time NOW before you have another problem to completely and thoroughly map out what is on each and every circuit in your house. You need this information down to each and every receptacle, light and appliance.
 
  #7  
Old 09-25-07, 03:31 PM
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Similar to the orignal poster, my house has a GFCI receptacle in the garage, which protects the receptacles in each of the three bathrooms. Two of these bathrooms are upstairs and therefore far away from the garage GFCI. Is it worthwhile to buy separate GFCIs for each bathroom? For each of these GFCIs, all of the wiring would go to the line terminals with nothing connected to the load terminals.
 
  #8  
Old 09-25-07, 03:38 PM
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No reason to do that unless you have a tripping issue and don't like to walk to the garage to reset it. If you have a problem with GFCI tripping often then you should repair the problem. Other wise no reason other than convenience.
 
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