Washer/dryer plug orientation

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  #1  
Old 09-25-07, 09:52 PM
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Washer/dryer plug orientation

Total electrical nooby so please forgive me.

I purchased a new washer and got it all hooked up this evening, but got to the last step of plugging it in. The problem is the new washer's male plug has a 90 angle in it, 'flat' style if you will, where the old was a straight. The receptacle is vertically oriented and the dryer's plug is also a 'straight'. They will not fit together. I assume they are both 120v, because they are the normal 3 prong jobs I'm used to, but honestly have no clue about this stuff.

I know I can't use a straight plug extension cord for either so my question is about cost for replacing the receptacle to a horizontal or 'side by side' style (if there is such a thing) which would allow both. A good friend was a electrician and I know he can handle it, but is there such a thing and is it an inexpensive fix for this situation. (Wasn't expecting the cost of a new washer )

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 09-25-07, 10:19 PM
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Simplest in my humble opinion would be to put a single gang old work box about 3" from the existing box and install a simplex or duplex receptacle fed by the existing receptacle. I' might also just consider replacing the existing single gang box with a double gang box and two receptacles for a neater appearance.

I think I have seen the type of receptacle you mention posted on the board but my suggestion might be quicker then finding and ordering one.
 
  #3  
Old 09-26-07, 04:25 AM
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There are many possibilities...

You can buy a duplex receptacle at an electrical supply store that will work. You could replace the one duplex receptacle with two duplex receptacles. You could add a second duplex receptacle close to the first one.
 
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Old 09-26-07, 06:02 AM
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If the plug on the dryer has a two blades, one perpendicular to the other, plus a round pin, that's a 20 amp plug.
The receptacle you describe with two vertical blades plus the round pin is a 15 amp.

You cannot replace the 15 amp receptacle with a 20 amp one unless you first verify the wiring feeding it is capable of 20 amps.

I'm taking it this is a gas dryer as well, since an electric one would/should have 4 blades.
 
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Old 09-26-07, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
You can buy a duplex receptacle at an electrical supply store that will work.
Really? Like I described, a 'side by side' horizontal that would allow the plugs to still orient 2 prongs on top and 1 on the bottom? That would be great and maybe even easy enough for me to handle.....ok maybe not. What would a conversion like this cost me? (sorry if asking that is a no no) I ask because I don't believe I can get my friend around to the house before my wife blows her top from not being to wash clothes.

And yes, Pendragon both the gas dryer and new washer are 2 verts 1 round 15 amp.
 
  #6  
Old 09-26-07, 06:29 AM
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I do not know what it would cost to have an electrician come into your house and do work. It depends on rates in the area and other factors. Make sure that you discuss your situation in detail with any electrician, so that he or she can bring the correct part.

A simple receptacle replacement you can do yourself, if you feel comfortable.

The horizontal duplex receptacle would have the individual receptacles oriented 90 degrees from the way they are now.

You do have other choices which will work in the short term (so you can wash and dry clothes). Buy and use a short heavy duty extension cord. By short I mean three feet or less. Or use a power strip.
 
  #7  
Old 09-26-07, 07:23 AM
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I just re-read your post.

If one plug is right angle, and one is straight, they both should fit.

However, that's an aside. Another suggestion is to replace the plug on the end of the cord. You can buy a replacement plug at most big box stores. Replacing the pug would require that you properly identify the three wires, but that is not hard to do.
 
  #8  
Old 09-26-07, 07:32 AM
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Sorry racraft, that was a mistake. The dryer plug is also a 90 degree, hence the problem. I might look into changing out the washer plug....as that definitely seems the simplest solution. Would you suggest using heat shrink tubing on the new connection?
 
  #9  
Old 09-26-07, 07:55 AM
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I would change the older appliance plug. You will buy a new plug. The existing cord will attach to the new plug. There is no need for shrink tubing or tape.
 
  #10  
Old 09-26-07, 09:42 AM
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Is the outlet-box on which the duplex receptacle is mounted a "surface" box or a "flush" box?

A metal outlet-box fastened to the "face" of a masonary wall is a "surface" box, as is a box, metal or plastic, fastened to an exposed stud .

A box which is concealed behind the wall - finish is a "flush" box. The solution, which seems to be two receptacles "side-by-side" , depends on the type of outlet-box.
 
  #11  
Old 09-26-07, 09:44 AM
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It is a 'surface' box with conduit running to it along the masonry wall.
 
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Old 09-26-07, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by chetspartan View Post
It is a 'surface' box with conduit running to it along the masonry wall.
If at the end of the conduit then an easy fix would be to replace the single gang box with a double gang and two duplex outlets. Definitely a DIY job.
 
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Old 09-26-07, 10:26 AM
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Just change the single gang box to a two gang box and two gang cover you will have a quad outlet configuration when your finished.

Roger
 
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Old 09-26-07, 11:04 AM
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The fact that this is surface mounted conduit changes everything.

Switch to a double gang surface mount box and install a second duplex receptacle, or install a second surface mount box containing a duplex receptacle wired with conduit from this box.
 
  #15  
Old 09-26-07, 12:00 PM
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IF the box is a 4" sq. metal box , then simply attach a "double-duplex Austin" cover it --- no need to replace the box.
 
  #16  
Old 09-26-07, 12:18 PM
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Let me add this item here but i dont know if you can find this product this item you will find this in electrical supply centre but big box store i dont know unless it can be specal order

anyway here the link [ it is pdf file so it will take a sec or two ] http://www.passandseymour.com/pdf/B40.pdf

here ya go

i did install quite few of them and they are not cheap btw.
but it worth the money in few spots

Merci, Marc
 
  #17  
Old 09-26-07, 12:33 PM
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PATTBAA - Unfortunately it is a rectangular box off the conduit that matches the faceplate for the two receptacles in size.

french277V - Thanks for the link, but I'll never need all four receptacles. The dryer and washer are the only things on that side of the laundry room that require power.

I'll see if I can find that plug replacement kit thing racraft mentioned as that seems the quickest, simplest and most affordable solution. I'll let you know what I come up with. Just in case, is there a good 'how-to' on the site for changing over from duplex to a quadplex?
 
  #18  
Old 09-26-07, 12:51 PM
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Buy and read the book "Wiring Simplified." It will answer all your questions about wiring both the new plug (if you go that route) or a new box at the end of the conduit (if you go that route).

At this point, I recommend the new double gang box and 2 duplex receptacles.
 
  #19  
Old 09-26-07, 02:45 PM
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"NIpple" a "1900" box to the bottom or side of the existing "utility" box with a 1/2" x 2" nipple and four 1/2" lock-nuts. If you want two single receptacles in the "1900" box ,you will need a matching "Austin" cover ,which may not be available. Best to settle for two duplex receptacle and the matching cover.

I urge you NOT to use the utility box for a receptacle because of the limited cubic-inch area. Use the existing box as a splice-box only.
 
  #20  
Old 09-26-07, 02:56 PM
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Thanks for all the help. My buddy can actually make it by tonight and we're going to tackle this thing. I'm going the dual duplex route, so that being said here's my list of supplies. Please correct me if I'm wrong as I do not know what I'm talking about.

___________________________________________________
1 x double gang surface mount box

2 x duplex receptacles (the existing one is old and I figure why not replace it) - specifics here? 15amp GFCI? (I really don't know)

1 x cover for the new duplexes

some 12g or 14g wire

wire caps (or whatever there called)

electrical tape

mounting hardware for the new box (if it doesn't come with it already)
___________________________________________________

Anything else I'm forgetting? Any idea on cost here, I have a Home Depot only a 5 minute drive away.

Thanks again.
 
  #21  
Old 09-26-07, 03:05 PM
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You do not need electrical tape, but it is good to have around. You can probably get away with a single piece of 14-2 cable or 12-2 cable (they sell it by the foot). You will use the cable to make the pigtails you will need.

You do not need 20 amp receptacles. If the circuit is a 20 amp circuit you can use either 15 or 20 amp, but there is no need for the 20 amp ones.

GFCI may or may not be needed. It depends on the proximity of a sink and on where in your house this is located.
 
  #22  
Old 09-26-07, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
GFCI may or may not be needed. It depends on the proximity of a sink and on where in your house this is located.
Thanks racraft. I'll go with 15amp duplexes then. The outlet is about 4'5" off the ground (roughly 5-6" above the top of the dryer and washer) and I'd say 3'5" from the laundry tub in the basement furnace/laundry room on the same wall.
 
  #23  
Old 09-26-07, 03:48 PM
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Three and a half feet from the sink eliminates the GFCI requirement due to sink proximity.

This sounds like an unfinished basement room, meaning that a GFCI would be required. However, you can probably avoid one as this is a laundry area, and those receptacles are not easily used.
 
  #24  
Old 09-26-07, 05:27 PM
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Bob its 6 feet in a laundry...210.8 something don't have the book at the moment. not sure if readily accessible rule applies.
 
  #25  
Old 09-26-07, 06:01 PM
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Roger, you are right. I'm not sure where I remembered 6 feet from...
 
  #26  
Old 09-26-07, 08:40 PM
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A little late on this one but file it away for future problems of the same kind. There is a device manufactured that has 2 rotating receptacles on a single yoke, fits a single gang box. It was originally designed to allow 2 wall warts to be used but it is fuly UL listed for 15 AMP use. Type in "rotating outlet" in a search engine and it should come up.
 
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