Stove Top Wire

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Old 10-03-07, 09:23 PM
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Stove Top Wire

I have a 4 burner stove top. I decided to change out the wire since it was really old aluminum and only 3 wire (2 hots & 1 ground tied with stove neutral) I pulled new 4 wire (8 GA) from the panel and saw the J-box coming from the stove top was fed with 4 wire 12 GA (stranded)

I thought this odd and unsafe--a 40 amp breaker stove top to ultimately have 12 GA wire. (no clue why, but I'm positive I saw 12 awg printed on the wire.) My plan is to change the breaker to 30A.

Does this sound reasonable???? Thanks!!!
 
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Old 10-03-07, 10:02 PM
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Absolutely......#12 is a NO-NO..

As far as changing the breaker, find out what the stove top requires. It may very well require 40 amps, But that decision ultimately relies on "Valid" documentation from the equipment manufacturer. Unless this is an extremely long run....#8 would be fine for either the 30 or 40 amp breaker. Since you were "SAAVY" enough to run 4 wires...you must convert this to a four wire set up...But Im betting you already know that.....
 
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Old 10-03-07, 10:20 PM
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The #12 may in fact be okay if it's part of the original assembly whip from the manufacturer; the rules for premises wiring established in the NEC are different than the rules for wiring used inside appliances. The breaker should be sized to match the nameplate rating or installation instructions for the cooktop.

If the #12 was not part of the original assembly, then yes it needs to be corrected.
 
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Old 10-03-07, 11:25 PM
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The wiring is permitted by code. The two nameplate ratings from the stove top and the oven are added together and are to be treated as one load. Art. 210.19(3) and table 220.55(4)
 
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Old 10-04-07, 05:32 AM
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Gen has not made any statements about an oven. If this circuit serves only a stove top then it is likely that 40 amps is too large.

As the others have stated, you need to find out what the manufacturer calls for and whether the short section of 12 gage wire is original and part of the stove top or whether it was added by someone else.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 09:03 AM
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I'm happy with all the responses. (true--no oven involved) I changed to 30A breaker. Perhaps because we never use more than 2 burners at a time, it'll never blow anyway.
 
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Old 10-09-07, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Gen View Post
I'm happy with all the responses. (true--no oven involved) I changed to 30A breaker. Perhaps because we never use more than 2 burners at a time, it'll never blow anyway.
No good...not safe.

"Perhaps"....As in "maybe" is not good enough when you're talking about a electrical circuit.
You and your family's safety depends on it.

I would confirm the amperage of the cook-top and apply the correct size wire and breaker.

Just a opinion
steve
 
 

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