Outdoor hot tub GFCI question

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Old 10-04-07, 02:10 PM
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Outdoor hot tub GFCI question

I've been reading that I need a GFCI breaker in the main panel and a cut-off switch outside for my hot tub. The hot tub cut-off switches for sale at Home Depot look like they include a GFCI breaker. So, can I use one of these and put a regular 50A breaker in the main panel?

~Brent
 
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Old 10-04-07, 02:27 PM
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Yes, the GFCI disconnect satisfies both requirements for GFCI protection and maintenance disconnect. There are many other concerns when installing a spa; pay particular attention to the legal wiring methods for spas as well as the bonding requirements.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 04:02 PM
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Thanks for the quick response.

I know I need to use a 8' ground rod and I need to ground the wire mesh used to reinforce the concrete slab. Am I correct that the mesh would also have to be bonded to the pump and controller box?

For the wiring, I know it needs to be 6awg. Should I run this in conduit all the way to the hot tub (underground). If so what type of conduit is best? It is about 25' total from the main panel to the hot tub. Cut-off switch would be about 6' from the tub. The tub is 240v/50A.

Thanks again,
Brent
 
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Old 10-04-07, 04:15 PM
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You do not use a ground rod. None. Period.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
You do not use a ground rod. None. Period.
The spa manual says:

"Without proper grounding and bonding, a system malfunction may cause fatal shock"

..and..

"An approved ground may be an 8' long ground rod, a plate electrode, or a buried metal water pipe with at least 10 feet of buried pipe."

So you are saying I should only connect it to the ground from the house and not to a ground rod?

~BR
 
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Old 10-04-07, 08:07 PM
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The instructions are incorrect. Note that they are ambiguous. The word may is used...

You run an insulated ground wire out to the GFCI disconnect. From there a ground is run to the hot tub. All metal is then properly bonded.

No ground rod is used. No electrode. Nothing.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by rade0041 View Post
Thanks for the quick response.

I know I need to use a 8' ground rod and I need to ground the wire mesh used to reinforce the concrete slab. Am I correct that the mesh would also have to be bonded to the pump and controller box?

Thanks again,
Brent
not for hot tub useage as what Racraft saying with this word
You run an insulated ground wire out to the GFCI disconnect. From there a ground is run to the hot tub. All metal is then properly bonded
and
No ground rod is used. No electrode. Nothing.
that it.

Merci, Marc
 
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Old 10-05-07, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by rade0041 View Post
Am I correct that the mesh would also have to be bonded to the pump and controller box?
Some local inspectors require bonding of the rebar mesh, others do not; check with your inspector on this one.

For the wiring, I know it needs to be 6awg. Should I run this in conduit all the way to the hot tub (underground). If so what type of conduit is best?
Use 1" or 1-1/4" PVC conduit buried at least 18" deep for the underground portions. For a pure 240V tub, you'll use two black #6 THWN hot conductors plus a #10 green insulated ground. For a 240/120V tub, you'll need to add a white #6 THWN neutral conductor. Some tub instructions require an upsize of the ground from #10 to #8.
 
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