Electrical Outlets

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  #1  
Old 10-11-07, 08:53 AM
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Electrical Outlets

This is a rather basic question but what is the rule of thumb regarding how many outlets to place on one 120 circuit?

I anticipate using a stereo, TV, bar fridge, and perhaps a electric fireplace in the rec room.

I am starting my rec room and will have to wire it from the fuse box. should I be able to run 8 outlets on one circuit then run 8 recesses cans on another?

Any help would be great
 
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  #2  
Old 10-11-07, 09:04 AM
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Location: Alberta, Canada
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According to the CANADIAN Elec. Code, you are allowed up to 12 outlets on a 15a cct.. If your load is known than you are allowed up to 1200w per 15a/120v cct. You just have to be a little bit careful with motor loads, as they draw alot more current during startup. Generally, I try not to put any motor loads(ie: small bar fridges) with any electronics.
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-07, 09:05 AM
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The number of receptacles means nothing. What is important is what you DO with those receptacles.

I recommend a dedicated circuit for your home entertainment center. Even if that center is only a stereo and TV right now, it might get larger later on.

I also recommend a dedicated circuit if you plan on a computer setup.

You can then safely put the balance of the room on a single circuit.

As for the lights, the 8 recessed lights are fine on a 15 or 20 amp circuit.
 
  #4  
Old 10-11-07, 09:07 AM
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In most places in the United States, there are no fixed rules about how many outlets you can put on one circuit. In Canada and other countries, there are other rules. We don't know where you are. Please put your location in your profile for the best advice.

Some inspectors seem to impose their own rules over and above the code. So it's always wise to ask your building department if they have specific rules. Sometimes you can talk the inspector out of enforcing his rules if you have a good reason, but why tempt fate?

So now we've dealt with what's required. Now let's talk about what's recommended. Ideally, if you know what loads you will be plugging in, you tailor the circuit just for those loads. For example, if you are going to use this circuit for a refrigerator or freezer or tanning bed or treadmill or dishwasher, the correct number of outlets on the circuit may be one.

If you have no idea what will be plugged in (e.g., just general receptacles around a family room), then about 8 to 10 receptacles on a 15-amp circuit or about 10 to 12 on a 20-amp circuit is about right. You can go above or below these numbers as you see fit.

In less expensive homes, receptacles and lighting are often on the same circuit. This usually means the lights dim briefly when you turn on the vacuum cleaner. Although not unsafe, it's annoying. That's why in more expensive homes, they usually keep lighting and receptacles on separate circuits.
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-07, 09:15 AM
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Just to clarify I am located in Canada
 
  #6  
Old 10-11-07, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by con771 View Post
Just to clarify I am located in Canada
see post #2.
What province are you in?
 
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