electric range element question

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  #1  
Old 10-14-07, 09:21 AM
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electric range element question

For my son's science project he needs to be able to measure the amount of power used by a range element at highest setting versus lowest setting.
Is this possible to monitor and guage?
Thanks for any help/advice.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-14-07, 09:55 AM
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Not impossible, but purhaps risky.

I can think of two ways. One is with a clamp on amp meter. You would need to open the electrical panel, clamp the meter around one of the wires to the range. Then take readings of the amp draw on the various settings. If you also took a voltage reading, you could use ohms law where P = E x I or multiply the voltage times the amperage to calculate power.

A safer way, though possible less convient to other members of the house, would be to turn off all of the breakers feeding the house except the stove. next look at the dial outside on the meter and determine how much power is used for each revolution of the dial. Turn the stove on a setting see how many revolutions the dial makes during a given amount if time, say 5 minuts. Next count the revolutions during the same amount of time for each additional setting that you want to test.

If you use the electric meter method, someone else will need to help you do the calculations, I am a bit rusty on these.
 
  #3  
Old 10-14-07, 10:14 AM
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I did a little more research and found out that my electric meter is rated 7.2 which means I have used 7.2 Watt Hours every time the disk makes one revolution.

This label was easy to find on the face of the meter.

The disk on mine also has tick marks that count from 0 to 100 as the disk rotates. This makes it easy to calculate parts of a revolution. For example 2.49 revolutions in a given amount of time.

I found a helpfull web site with the formula to calculate useage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_meter

Scroll down to READING and the formula is given to convert your disk rotations and time into KWH.

I hope this helps and good luck on your project.
 
  #4  
Old 10-14-07, 10:44 AM
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Sorry to flood, but I got hung up on this.

The formula on the web page I posted is for counting the revolutions for one minute. I realized studying it just how easy this really is. the KWh on the meter is just a multiplier. The K in KWh is decieving because the multiplier is really in WH.

One could easily use any method they choose to determine how many revolutions the meter would make in one hour then multiply by the 7.2 from the meter. For example if you had 15 revolutions in 5 minutes then multiply 15 times 12 to get 180 rph then multiply times the multiplier from the meter to get 1296 Watts. Since a Watt hour is just one watt for one hour this would be billed to you as 1.296 KWH.

On another note, could you please post back with the results. I am curious to know if the lower setting uses less energy, or if the variable resistance of the dial uses the energy anyway.
 
  #5  
Old 10-14-07, 06:06 PM
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Elec. range science project

Thanks for the advice and we will certainly post you the results.
 
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