Electrical outlets & kitchen refurb

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Old 10-24-07, 10:41 AM
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Electrical outlets & kitchen refurb

I'm refurbing my kitchen counter and need to relocate the outlets. I have decided to run 4 new circuits - 2 to accomodate the new diswasher & the microwave and 2 for countertop appliances. Which leaves me with the problem of what to do with the 2 old outlets. Am I allowed to just cap the wires and hide them behind the full backsplash? Or do I have to totally pull the old circuit out and disconnect from whatever junction/outlet box they originate from?

Thanks,

Mo
 
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Old 10-24-07, 10:55 AM
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In order to put the wires in the wall and abandon them they need to be dead, and the other end of the wires needs to be outside any live box.
 
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Old 10-24-07, 10:55 AM
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Is the existing circuit 15A or 20A? Does it serve only the countertop receptacles?

When abandoning old circuits, any wires that are still live, or could be reconnected, must be in permanently accessible junction boxes. Wires there are completely disconnected and pushed out of the junction box on both ends may be left in the wall.
 
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Old 10-24-07, 11:19 AM
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Thanks for the quick response.
I guess I'll have to go play detective and track down the relevant junction boxes (it's an older house). And yes, the current circuit serves multiple rooms.

What is a permanently accessible junction box? Is it one in the basement ceiling or behind a removable panel? Can it be behind a kitchen wall cabinet? How about a countertop wall outlet? Am I correct in assuming that any junction box carrying live wires has to be permanently accessible?

I suspect I already know the answer!

Thanks,

Mo
 
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Old 10-24-07, 11:32 AM
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You should determine what type of circuit the "old outlets" are connected to . If it's a 20 amp circuit , and #12 wire , it may be possible to connect the fridge to this circuit.

Where are these outlets located, relative to the sink and the counter-top?. Also , how many wires in the two "old" boxes?.

One "old" outlet-box may have a "Feed-In" cable-pair and a "Feed-Out" cable-pair to the other "Old" outlet box so you can isolate the 2nd "old" outlet-box by disconnecting the "Feed-Out" cable in other "old" box.

You must be positively certain there are no other outlets affected by this.
 
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Old 10-24-07, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by aramis7350 View Post
What is a permanently accessible junction box? Is it one in the basement ceiling or behind a removable panel?
I believe the code language say that the box must be accessible without removing any of the building finish materials. The box can simply have a blank faceplate or be behind an access panel or above a suspended ceiling. It can't be covered by drywall, paneling, built-in cabinets, etc.

Am I correct in assuming that any junction box carrying live wires has to be permanently accessible?
Correct.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 08:18 AM
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One more question concerning this project.

Is it permitted to have outlets, wired to 2 different circuits, located in the same outlet box?
This is a countertop outlet box, in which I'd like to house the microwave outlet as well as one countertop appliance outlet. I have purchased GFCI breakers for the countertop circuits. Does the microwave (which will be housed in a microwave wall cabinet) need to be on a GFCI?
If it is permitted to have both outlets in the same box, do I need to specifically identify the GFCI controlled outlet vs the other?

Thanks,

Mo
 
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Old 10-25-07, 08:37 AM
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It is allowed to have two different circuits serving the same box. You can even have them serving the same receptacle if you wish, but you would have to break the tabs on BOTH sides of the device to do this.

Any receptacles that serve the counter top must be GFCI protected, even if dedicated for a single device like a microwave. However, a receptacle that serves (is located in) a microwave wall cabinet does not need GFCI protection.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 09:03 AM
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Thanks, Racraft!

In theory, the microwave outlet box will be countertop accessible.
Can I use a 'single outlet' receptacle to compel dedicated microwave use of that particular circuit? Or does it mean that the outlet box should be located in the microwave cabinet itself?
I guess, by installing a GFCI outlet or GFCI breaker for the microwave, I could do away with that bit of uncertainity.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 09:24 AM
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Whether duplex or simplex, the receptacle requires GFCI protection if it's countertop-accessible. If installed in the microwave cabinet, then GFCI protection is not required.

A simplex receptacle on a dedicated circuit is a good idea, but not required.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 09:42 AM
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Thanks, Guys!

You have been awesome!
 
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Old 10-25-07, 09:52 AM
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A simplex receptacle for a dedicated circuit makes sense if the receptacle is easily accessible and might be used by someone else not realizing the potential problem. An example would be a window air conditioner circuit with the receptacle right below the window. You would not want someone trying to use a vacuum cleaner with the air conditioner on.

A simplex receptacle is less important if the receptacle is not accessible, such as if it resides in the cabinet above an over the range microwave, or if it is hidden behind the refrigerator or freezer.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 10:45 AM
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The term dedicated can be confusing if not used clearly. A circuit having multiple outlets can be dedicated to a particular area, such as a bath, kitchen or laundry. A circuit dedicated to a single piece of equipment is defined as an individual branch circuit. Often, the term “dedicated” is used when “individual” would be more appropriate.

An individual branch circuit can have only one outlet. A duplex receptacle is two.

Section 422.16(B)(4) requires a, plug connected, “over the range” microwave to be on an individual branch circuit.
 
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