basement wiring

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Old 10-25-07, 12:44 PM
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basement wiring

Hi all,

I'm new here so if this question has been asked already, please direct me to the answer.

I just moved into a new house with partially finished basement. There are stud walls but no drywall yet. There are no recepticles and I'd like to add circuits to supply electricity to the rooms that I will eventually finish. There is plenty of room in the 200 amp service box for additional breakers. I believe that unfinished basement areas require 12 ga wire, 20 amp breakers, and GFI's and some areas will remain unfinished, e.g the workshop and storage areas. However, I also plan to have a finished game room. My question is: Can I finish the gameroom as if it were a regular room in the main living area by using 14 ga wire, 15 amp breakers and no GFIs or do I have to use the GFIs and 12 ga and 20 amp circuit breakers? Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
bsmtdweller
 
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Old 10-25-07, 01:19 PM
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Unfinished basements do NOT require 20 amp circuits. They do require GFCI protected receptacles.

That being said, I recommend that you use ONLY 20 amp circuits for all receptacles. You will appreciate the additional power provided by a 20 amp circuit verses a 25 amp circuit, and the cost is not that much more for the 12 gage wire.

Put your lighting on 15 amp circuits if you want. And I do recommend that your lighting be separated from your recetpacles.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 01:35 PM
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Thanks for the help RA. GFI protected means that the first recepticle on the circuit is a GFI recepticle correct? The subsequent recepticles are then regular?

bsmtdweller
 
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Old 10-25-07, 01:39 PM
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That is one way to provide GFCI protection. It works, provided the connections are correct and you truly have the first receptacle.

Another way is to use a GFCI circuit breaker.

A third way is to make every receptacle a GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 02:25 PM
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Ok, great info! Thanks again.
 
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Old 10-26-07, 09:21 AM
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Also remember that finished rooms need to adhere to some rules including receptacle spacing (min 6' from doors, 12' between receps), switched lighting (overhead or a receptacle for a lamp), etc. It may be easier to plan these things now rather than having to redo them when you decide to finish the rooms.

Unfinished rooms generally only need one GFI receptacle, though you may find it more convenient to install multiple.

Good luck!
 
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Old 10-26-07, 10:35 AM
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Good book on wiring codes and installation

Thanks for the info. This all leads me to another question. I know that codes vary by state and locality, but is there a good wiring book that provides all the general code requirements and practical information for residential wiring?

bsmtdweller
 
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Old 10-26-07, 12:20 PM
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Old 10-26-07, 01:10 PM
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Wiring Simplified, available in the electrical department of most big box stores is a good and inexpensive book to start with.
 
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Old 10-26-07, 07:26 PM
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Thanks again all!
 
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