Electric dryer hookup

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  #1  
Old 10-26-07, 04:09 PM
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Electric dryer hookup

I'm a weekend handyman who occasionally does basic wiring and plumbing jobs for friends. I've been asked to run a hookup line for an electric dryer which has not been purchased yet and won't be for a couple weeks. They want me to put the line in now, and will be looking for a pre-owned dryer so I'm not sure what type of plug it will have.
I'll be running 10-gauge from a 30 amp breaker in the main panel in the basement, along the floor joists to the other side of the house (about 25 ft). The hookup will be on a concrete block wall. I figure 10/3 with ground is best to make sure it's up to code.

If I don't know whether this will be a 4-prong or an older 3-prong plug on the dryer, what's a good way to do that end so it will be safe, and easy to put up a receptacle when the time comes?
Should I just mount a steel junction box on the wall, with a cover?
Can I mount the receptacle on the box, or should it be mounted seperately? Should I anchor a board to mount the box/receptacle on, or can they be direct on the concrete wall?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-26-07, 04:18 PM
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New install you MUST install a four prong receptacle. If the dryer comes with a three prong cord you must change it to a four prong cord.
No separate junction box. Just mount the receptacle in the one junction box at the end of the run.
 
  #3  
Old 10-26-07, 08:16 PM
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Not a pro - and this might be a local code, but I think you need a "disconnect" within a certain distance of the drier.
 
  #4  
Old 10-26-07, 08:38 PM
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You do not need a disconnect for a dryer unless it is some weird requirement in your town.
 
  #5  
Old 10-27-07, 04:57 AM
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The cord and plug would satisfy any need for a disconnect. Just unplug the cord.
 
  #6  
Old 10-27-07, 06:15 AM
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New install you MUST install a four prong receptacle.
I read elsehere in this forum that the 4-prong is only required in homes built after a certain year--2000, I think? Can anyone clarify this? This home is at least 50 yrs old. Just wondering in case they get an older dryer with a 3-prong plug, they need to keep costs down. We're in a rural area where it might be pretty inconvenient to have to get a 4-prong pigtail.
 
  #7  
Old 10-27-07, 06:39 AM
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The age of the home has NOTHING to do with it. ANY new dryer or range circuits MUST be 4-wire . NO exception. This has been a code requirement for quite some time now, so it is HIGHLY doubtful that your area does not require this.

EVERYONE, including hardware stores, home centers, down to the internet and mail order, carries 4-prong cords and receptacles. Being in a rural area makes no difference, I still bet there is one not too far from your house.
 
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Old 10-27-07, 08:38 AM
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Note that it makes no difference whether it is a new dryer or a used dryer, if the circuit is new it MUST be four wire. If the dryer is bought used and it has a three wire cord, it must be changed to be a four wire cord.
 
  #9  
Old 10-27-07, 08:40 AM
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It's not home from before 2000. It's wiring that was installed before (not sure of year). It was to code at that time it was installed and is not required to be changed unless the circuit is being modified.

A new circuit install must meet the codes in place at the time the circuit is being installed not at the time the house was built.
 
  #10  
Old 10-27-07, 07:24 PM
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AFAIK, 1996 it the year code was changed to require new dryer and range circuits be 4 wire. This includes new or modified dryer/range circuits in houses built before 1996.
 
  #11  
Old 10-29-07, 08:04 PM
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Another question if anyone is still with me--
A large part of the existing wiring is run through drilled holes in the joists. The joists are perpendicular to the dryer run, which will go across the full width of the house, (30 ft.) -- what a struggle that will be, especially with 10/3 w/ground!

A couple joists will have to be drilled where a heat duct exists
, but is there any reason why I can't staple most of the run to the joist bottoms? Do I need a backing board? It's an unfinished basement, and probably always will be.

Thanks in advance for some advice on this.
 
  #12  
Old 10-30-07, 04:17 AM
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If you are running perpendicular to the joists then you need to drill holes or use a running board.
 
  #13  
Old 10-30-07, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
If you are running perpendicular to the joists then you need to drill holes or use a running board.
That's correct and good advice.

You can use a 1 x 2 (or 2 x 2) piece of lumber for the running board.
Just nail it to the bottom of the joists and staple the cable to it.

....or...

you can run a 3/4" PVC conduit (supported every 3 feet max) under the joists and put the cable in that.
One hole straps and wood screws, it goes up fast.

Just my opinion
steve
 
  #14  
Old 10-30-07, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by hillbilly ace View Post
you can run a 3/4" PVC conduit (supported every 3 feet max) under the joists and put the cable in that.
One hole straps and wood screws, it goes up fast.

Oops, spoke too quick.

The Electrical Code (for some un-known reason) doesn't allow you to fasten conduit to the bottom of floor joists in a un-finished basement and install NM (Romex) cable in it.

You can run it along the wall and it's perfectly OK, Just not on the ceiling.

On the ceiling, it's either bored holes or running boards.

steve
 
  #15  
Old 10-30-07, 09:50 AM
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The Electrical Code (for some un-known reason) doesn't allow you to fasten conduit to the bottom of floor joists in a un-finished basement and install NM (Romex) cable in it.
Hillbilly, will you please cite the code reference for that?
 
  #16  
Old 10-31-07, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
Hillbilly, will you please cite the code reference for that?
NEC 334.15(C)

It doesn't specifically say that you can't.

It does say that Cables "not smaller than two #6 or three #8 can be fastened directly to the bottom of the joists....

...and...


"Smaller Cables shall be run either thru bored holes in joists or on running boards"

...and...

"NM cable used on a wall of a un-finished basement shall be permitted to be installed in a listed conduit or tubing.

It's that "Shall" that decides it, in my opinion.

I know that it's the kind of wording that the inspectors around here love to use to "red tag" a job.

Just a opinion
steve
 
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