Connecting Compressor to 230V Circuit

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  #1  
Old 10-27-07, 07:22 AM
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Connecting Compressor to 230V Circuit

First post to this great forum. I want to buy 230V compressor for the garage. The one I'm looking at is http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...0_level1_HUSKY . I have a 2500W Baseboard heater in the garage now. It is the only thing on the 20A breaker and I've run 10 G wire to it. My question is, can I hook the compressor into that circuit with the breaker that I have so that they can both run at the same time or do I have to make changes to the breaker/wiring?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-27-07, 08:40 AM
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What is the compressor motor FLA (Full load amps) and voltage?
It should be on the motor plate.

steve

Oh yea....What is the baseboard heater voltage?
 
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Old 10-27-07, 08:44 AM
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The "starting-current" of the motor can be 300% of the "running" current. For a "true" 3 HP motor the running-current is approx 20 amps . so the starting-current could be 50-60 amps.

AS to "true" , there seems to be doubts about the actual HP of a motor that is advertised as "X HP" in the sales info.

If you connect a motor to a circuit with other ( non-motor) loads , it's a "combination Branch-Circuit, and there are specific Code requirements for this type of circuit -- the wire-guage and the rating ( in amps ) of the circuit-breaker.

Good Luck, & Learn & Enjoy from the Experience!!!
 
  #4  
Old 10-28-07, 04:13 AM
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Originally Posted by hillbilly ace View Post
What is the compressor motor FLA (Full load amps) and voltage?
It should be on the motor plate.

steve

Oh yea....What is the baseboard heater voltage?
I'll have to check the motor info in the store since it is not in the specs. The Heater voltage is 230V.
 
  #5  
Old 10-28-07, 05:41 AM
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To calculate the circuit use 1.25 % of the continous load plus 100 percent of the non-continous load.

Your heater is 1500 watts/240v or 10.42 amps X 1.25 for a total of 13.02 amps. It is nice that you have 10 wire on the circuit, but the heater's max fuse or breaker size is probably 20 amps. So, you are limited to a 20 amp breaker on this circuit.

Since the compessor is a non-continous load you have 6.98 amps left for this item on this circuit.
 
  #6  
Old 10-28-07, 08:15 AM
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Your profile is blank on country but you keep writing 230v. Usually US posters incorrectly state the residential voltage as 220v but you are incorrectly stating it as 230v. You are in the U.S. aren't you?
 
  #7  
Old 10-30-07, 12:38 PM
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He is probably saying 230V because that is how the literature for the compressor refers to it. Remember that while our nominal line voltage is 240v, motors are rated at their utilization voltage of 230V. But you knew that, right?
 
  #8  
Old 10-30-07, 12:47 PM
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Your link does not work for me. Are you referring to the Model VT6314 3.2 hp 60 gallon? That unit draws 15 A at 230 volts. Multiplied by 125% comes out to 18.75 amps. So, a 20 amp circuit should be sufficient.
 
  #9  
Old 10-30-07, 07:06 PM
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Yes, I did confirm the compressor at 15A. I'm located in Canada so 220V is right for me. I checked with the guy at Home Depot and he suggested that I upgrade the in house breaker to 30A and have a second breaker in the garage, with a 20A and 30A breaker for each of the items. I'm not sure if this is the right way to go? I guess the easy way out would be to install another breaker in the main panel (there is room) and run a dedicated circuit to the compressor. BTW, thanks for all the help so far and any other comments would be appreciated.
 
  #10  
Old 10-31-07, 04:32 AM
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As to a dedicated circuit, that is the best plan for a load like this. I was not clear if you were going to remove the heater or not. You cannot/should not run both the compresser and heater on the same circuit. As to the 30A circuit the HD guy suggested, you need to check the max rated breaker size. It should be in either the documentation that comes with the compressor or on the motor itself. You have to be wary of these so called experts at HD. Some are really knowlegable about electrical, others have no idea what they are talking about.
 
  #11  
Old 10-31-07, 04:40 AM
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Sorry I misread your last post. The HD guy is suggesting that you run a 30A subpanel in your garage. Well, that goes back to my comment that these guys don't always know what they are talking about. There are quite a few more details to be worked out to run a subpanel like that. It can be done, but I would just run another circuit dedicated to the compressor. Remember to size it how the compressor documents suggest. There shouls be a minimum and/or maximum fuse/breaker size listed.
 
  #12  
Old 10-31-07, 12:16 PM
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Thanks for all your input. I think I'll run that second circuit. I had hoped that I could save some time and wiring by branching off of the heater, but I guess that can't be done.
 
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