Garage Outlets

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  #1  
Old 10-29-07, 06:29 PM
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Garage Outlets

I am rewiring my garage, I would like it to be up to code because I do plan to sell in a few years. I have read that code (California) calls for GFCI outlets in a garage. I am planning roughly 4 duplex outlets, all of them 20 amp. I will also have a 15 amp circuit for lighting only. So, do I need to install GFCI in all of the outlets? I have never seen that before. Should I just make sure that the circuit itself is covered? Lastly, does a garage door opener need to have a separate circuit or am I OK with putting that on the light circuit?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-29-07, 06:39 PM
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The NEC requires GFCI protection for garage receptacles. You only need one, as the first receptacle on the circuit. As long as you connect the outgoing side of the circuit to the LOAD terminals on the GFCI they will be protected.

You can certainly use 20 amp receptacles, but they will cost more than 15 amp ones, which are acceptable on a 20 amp circuit. I would only install 20 amp ones if you have a specific need for them.

The garage door opener does not require a dedicated circuit. It can be on the lighting circuit for the garage. However, keep in mind that if something should go wrong with the opener and the breaker trips, the garage will have no lights. The receptacle in the ceiling for the opener does not need GFCI protection, since it is NOT readily usable for anything else.

There are many other codes that apply. If you aren't familiar with them,m you may very well make a mistake. Why don't you run your entire plan by us and we can comment.

Start by telling us the make-up of the garage. Attached or detached (if detached your plan is already wrong)? Finished or unfinished walls? What about existing circuits already in place?
 
  #3  
Old 10-29-07, 07:51 PM
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Garage Wiring

The garage is attached. I have already run a 100 amp sub-panel to the garage. This panel will feed a dedicated 15 amp circuit for a fridge. A 15 amp circuit for lighting in the laundry area, as well as the low voltage landscape lighting etc. As I said, one circuit will feed lighting for the garage lighting only. I do have an air compressor, 110 table saw, chop saw etc. I have not decided if I want two separate 20 amp circuits in the garage. I will not be here in 3 years, so, that might be too much for most people. I think I would be OK with just one 20 amp since I tend not to use all of those tools at once.
The previous owner converted the dryer electrical to another subpanel. That was for motor home hook ups in the back yard. I myself would like to put that back to a dedicated outlet for a dryer and run a 30 amp circuit for motor home hook ups from my new panel.
The gargae will be finished wall. I have the new panel up to code, access etc. I hope this plan makes sense. Thank you in advance for your thoughts.
 
  #4  
Old 10-30-07, 05:33 AM
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The receptacle in the ceiling for the opener does not need GFCI protection, since it is NOT readily usable for anything else.

I don't know if it is national code, but my area requires that GDO receptacles have a single outlet so that they can only be used for that purpose. The inspector did give me the option of using a duplex GFI for the GDO.
 
  #5  
Old 10-30-07, 05:43 AM
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I have never heard of an inspector requiring a receptacle for a garage door opened needing GFCI protection if the receptacle is up near the opener (where it should be). However, I suppose that this could be considered up to interpretation.

Given those two options, I would install the simplex receptacle rather than the duplex GFCI.
 
  #6  
Old 10-30-07, 07:23 AM
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bob - my GDO receptacles are alongside the opener. I used duplex receptacles because I had some hanging around. The inspectors reasoning was that the unused outlet could be used for drop lights, power tools etc.
 
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