Halloween Project help

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  #1  
Old 10-29-07, 08:01 PM
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Halloween Project help

I have a Halloween projectů Im trying to make a project using both 12v and 110. I have a washing machine solenoid (110) hooked up to an air compressor. I also have a 12v light system that I have powered by a landscaping electrical transformer. Im trying to see what type of switch I can use (DPDT?) to turn them both on at the same time, and how I would wire this. Any Ideas?

thanks,

Dennis
 
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  #2  
Old 10-29-07, 08:12 PM
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Why couldn't you just hook everything that's 110 up to the same normal AC switch? In particular the transformer... that way your 12V would come up the same time as everything else.

Unless I'm missing something?

-core
 
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Old 10-29-07, 08:24 PM
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I thought about that, but there is a delay in the transformer that causes the lights to fire a couple of seconds after the solenoid. Im trying to figure a way out to keep continuous power to the transformer so everything fires at the same time. Is this possible?
 
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Old 10-29-07, 08:39 PM
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Well, in that case I don't personally see anything wrong with using a DPDT switch. As long as the switch is rated for the current draw (pay attention to the DC side) as well as the AC voltage.
 
  #5  
Old 10-29-07, 08:43 PM
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ok, in that case (ive never wired anything like this before)

How would I connect everything??


1 4
2 5
3 6
 
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Old 10-29-07, 08:45 PM
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LOL it's late and I'm tired. I meant single throw.

Since you've only got 4 terminals now that should simplify it. Sorry 'bout that. Do you need additional info still?
 
  #7  
Old 10-29-07, 08:56 PM
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no I guess not... unless someone else has some other ideas. I'll probably just pickup a momentary switch that i can split, one run to the transformer and one straight to the solenoid. Hopefully I can keep the solenoid closer to the switch to delay the air a little.

It should be a cool project. The air run through a small p-trap that allows water to enter when not active. once i throw the switch the air should blow a mist into the sky with the lights lighting up the particles. making it look like a mini volcano.

I'll cross my fingers.....

Core, thanks for your input..
 
  #8  
Old 10-29-07, 09:08 PM
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Sounds cool. What's the details on the lighting system? What I'm getting at here is ten 12V incandescent lights in series is of course 120V. You could just get rid of the transformer altogether in that case.

As for delaying things, having it farther away from the switch isn't gonna make that happen. Which side needs to be delayed? The air or the lights? (Your post seemed ambiguous there.)
 
  #9  
Old 10-29-07, 09:15 PM
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electric is not causing the delay that makes your project, out of time

You need to look at regulating the air.
 
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Old 10-29-07, 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by djpuf View Post
one run to the transformer and one straight to the solenoid
Just to clarify, what you want to do is attach the transformer OUTPUT (12V) to the switch, and the switch to the lights. On the other pole of that same switch one terminal goes to the hot AC line and the other to the solenoid.

I'm sure this is exactly how you took it, but I re-read that and wondered about the use of the word "split".
 
  #11  
Old 10-30-07, 06:56 AM
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ok, the lights...

I'm using a 200w transformer to convert from the 110v to the 12v. I also have 6 automobile tail light bulbs wired to the transformer. (painted red for effect)

I am by no means an electrician. I got the idea for this from a friend of mine that just so happens to be on vacation right now and left his phone at home. I am pretty good at REPLACING things like switches and outlets, but really have no idea when it comes to building/creating. I am probably not using the proper terminology as I ask my questions, so I apologize for that.

Im looking to be able to power both the solenoid and the lights using the same switch. WITHOUT electrocuting myself in the process. Guess I should go buy Electricity for Idiots!
 
  #12  
Old 10-30-07, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite View Post
electric is not causing the delay that makes your project, out of time

You need to look at regulating the air.
my air is almost instant when triggered. The lights however have a delay, either in the bulbs themselves or in the transformer.
 
  #13  
Old 10-30-07, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by djpuf View Post
Im looking to be able to power both the solenoid and the lights using the same switch. WITHOUT electrocuting myself in the process. Guess I should go buy Electricity for Idiots!
120 volts of electricity is nothing to play with.

It can and will kill you DEAD, really quick.

If I were you, I'd get a electrician to at least look at my invention before plugging it up.

Also, be sure to plug it into a GFI receptacle.
It won't protect you from all hazards, but it will help.

steve
 
  #14  
Old 10-31-07, 04:20 AM
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Originally Posted by djpuf View Post
there is a delay in the transformer that causes the lights to fire a couple of seconds after the solenoid.
A couple of seconds is a very long time for a transformer to charge. Something's not right. Are you running this project off a long, thin extension cord? The extension cord may not be heavy enough to handle the draw of the solenoid plus the load from the transformer.

Curious ... how are the lights sealed off from the water?
 
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